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Leadership Resilience - Optimism and Resilience

Leadership Resilience

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients – the CEO of a boutique hotel and restaurant company. We had a deep and reflective coaching conversation about how his company bounced back from two recessions. We talked about how he was able to work through his personal distress and low mood.

My executive coaching client and I further discussed how a leader’s emotions are contagious. I am coaching my client to help his employees become more resilient and create a culture of positivity.

Optimism and Resilience

Research clearly demonstrates that people who are naturally resilient have an optimistic explanatory style—that is, they explain adversity in optimistic terms to avoid falling into helplessness.

Those who refuse to give up routinely interpret setbacks as temporary, local and changeable:

· “The problem will resolve quickly…”

·  “It’s just this one situation…”

·  “I can do something about it…”

In contrast, individuals who have a pessimistic explanatory style respond to failure differently. They habitually think setbacks are permanent, universal and immutable:

·  “Things are never going to be any different...”

·  “This always happens to me...”

·  “I can’t change things, no matter what...”

University of Pennsylvania psychology professor Martin P. Seligman believes most people can be immunized against the negative thinking habits that may tempt them to give up after failure. In fact, 30 years of research suggests that we can learn to be optimistic and resilient—often by changing our explanatory style.

Seligman is currently testing this premise with the U.S. Army’s Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program, a large-scale effort to make soldiers as psychologically fit as they are physically fit. One key component is the Master Resilience Training course for drill sergeants and other leaders, which emphasizes positive psychology, mental toughness, use of existing strengths and building strong relationships.

This military program will no doubt provide insights for civilians who wish to become more effective within their workplaces and organizations.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to bounce back from adversity? Resilient leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create an adaptable culture.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I have an optimistic explanatory style?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you become more resilient. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

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Leadership Resilience - The Art of Bouncing Back

Leadership Resilience

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients – the CEO of a boutique hotel and restaurant company. We had an enlightening coaching conversation about how his company bounced back from two recessions.

My executive coaching client and I then discussed how a leader’s emotions are contagious? I am coaching my client to help his employees become more resilient and create a culture of positivity.

How we respond to failures and bounce back from our mistakes can make or break our careers. The wisdom of learning from failure is undeniable, yet individuals and organizations rarely seize opportunities to embrace these hard-earned lessons.

Harvard business professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter is unequivocal: “One difference between winners and losers is how they handle losing.” Even for the best companies and most accomplished professionals, long track records of success are inevitably marred by slips and fumbles.

Our response to failure is often counterproductive: Behaviors become bad habits that set the stage for continued losses. Just as success creates positive momentum, failure can feed on itself. Add uncertainty and rapidly fluctuating economics to the mix, and one’s ability to find the right course is sorely tested.

Long-term winners and losers face the same ubiquitous problems, but they respond differently. Attitudes help determine whether problem-ridden businesses will ultimately recover.

Luckily, most of us can learn to become more resilient with training and coaching.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to bounce back from adversity? Resilient leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create an adaptable culture.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “A I resilient in the face of a weak economy?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you become more resilient. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

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Level 1 Leadership Communication – Becoming the Leader You Want/Need to Be

You’ve probably heard the phrase “be careful what you wish for”, haven't you? Let's assume you have.

That was my exact thought at the age of 26 when I was thrust, unexpectedly, into the role of Vice President/General Manager of one of Minor League Baseball’s most successful franchises in the mid-80s in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Overnight I went from being comfortable in my role as assistant general manager into the top position of a $3 million business.

In looking back on that experience early in my career in baseball management, I realized I got into the game for selfish reasons and never envisioned myself as a leader. Well, to be fair, at that age many young men are self-seeking when it comes to their career aspirations. Wisdom comes with age and experience!

But at that age, I never really aspired to be a leader, I just wanted to work in baseball.

I’m making this point because it took me a long time, probably 10-12 years, before I felt comfortable in my leadership role. It took me that long to realize how important investing time and energy is in what I refer to as  Level 1 Leadership Communication.

Let me explain. Knowing these basic level skills provides an important foundation on which you build the trust and respect you need to lead people most effectively. It also provides the foundation from which you are then be able to get great results from your more advanced techniques… I call these Level 2 & Level 3 Leadership Communication.

Level 1 Leadership Communicationis about becoming self-aware and defining yourself as a leader, then committing to be the type of leader you want to be, and then acting congruently and consistently with that definition.

To help you get a better grasp on this, I have created two separate, but related, exercises.  One is called the WHO-WHAT-HOW Exercise, described below. (Don't just read about it; I encourage you to take out a piece of paper and work on this exercise):

 

WHO-WHAT-HOW Exercise:

WHO– Define whoyou want to be as a leader. Identify the traits, personality characteristics and the communication style you are committed to applying in your leadership role. If you know or have admired other leaders whom you would like to emulate, list them and their traits.

Example:

  • Detail oriented,
  • punctual,
  • early riser,
  • physically fit,
  • healthy diet,
  • communicates with directness but with compassion and empathy,
  • open minded,
  • curious,
  • true open door policy.

 

WHATWhat are the specific details behind each of the traits, personality characteristics and the communication style you want to use.

Example:

  • Ask a lot of questions,
  • listens actively and responds appropriately,
  • always uses appropriate eye contact,
  • is early for every meeting,
  • always prepares meeting agenda in advance and lets others review it for comments and adjustments before providing final copy in advance,
  • always has time for others when requested either in the moment or schedules a specific time as close as possible to the time the request is made,
  • always follows through with an answer to questions/requests in a timely fashion,
  • always maintains and projects appropriate emotional demeanor.

 

HOWHow are you committed to manifesting these traits and how are you committed to showing up as a leader. This is where the aspiring Champion Leader commits to applying those traits, characteristics  and actions into specific daily behaviors in leading their organization.

Example:

  • I promise to be early and prepare in advance for all meetings.
  • I will maintain a positive attitude and apply the most appropriate emotional responses to situations so that I can be a role model for those I lead.
  • I promise to lead by example in terms of my personal health and physical fitness, and
  • will treat all those who come before me with respect, empathy, compassion and genuineness.

 

The “HOW”section is the leader’s personal promise and standard statement to themselves and to those they lead. It is something those that aspire to be great leaders are willing to hold themselves accountable to and are willing to have those they lead hold them accountable to.

The WHO-WHAT-HOW exercise is a very powerful process offering a solid strategy for Level 1 Leadership Communication.

Once your WHO-WHAT-HOWis complete it is meant to be a living, working document that should be evaluated, and adjusted regularly, if required. It is also a great model to launch a 360 feedback process from those you lead, which will allow you to make adjustments that will have the greatest impact and results in leading your team and organization.

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Executive Wisdom - Developing Your Leadership Wisdom

Executive Wisdom

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients – the president of a professional services firm. We had a fascinating coaching conversation about the stupidest decision or action he had ever taken.

My executive coaching client and I then discussed as a leader in his organization, what was the wisest decision or action he had ever taken? I am coaching my client to tap into his wisdom and creativity to make wise decisions.

Developing Your Wisdom

Psychologist and author Richard R. Kilburg presents questions for improving leadership wisdom that can be reviewed in coaching sessions (Executive Wisdom: Coaching and the Emergence of Virtuous Leaders, APA, 2006).

  1. Take a moment to relax, then ask yourself the following questions:
    1. What is the stupidest thing you have ever done as a person or as a professional?
    2. If you are a leader in an organization, what is the stupidest decision or action you have ever taken?
    3. What made the decision or action stupid? When and how did you know it was stupid? What criteria did you use to judge its merits?
  2. Now, ask yourself,
    1. What is the wisest thing you have ever done as a person or as a professional?
    2. If you are a leader in an organization, what is the wisest decision or action you have ever taken?
    3. What made the decision or action wise? When and how did you know it was wise? What criteria did you use to judge its merits?
  3. Can you develop an internal sense of how you created, accessed, and used a sense of rightness in the situations in which you believe you acted wisely as opposed to stupidly? If so, jot down and reflect on what you think and feel went into the emergence of that sense of rightness.
  4. Take a few minutes to talk to someone out loud about what you have explored or, if you are reluctant to share it with another person, dictate some notes into a tape recorder and then listen to yourself afterward. The experience of giving voice to inner work can often provide additional insight and learning.

Discussing these issues with your executive coach will help you develop a powerful link to leading with wisdom.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to search for their executive wisdom? Wise leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to make good decisions.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “What is the wisest decision or action I have ever taken and why?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help your search for executive wisdom. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams.He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders. Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

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Great Leaders Master “Level 2 Leadership Communication” – Motivating the Team as a Team

Legendary stories abound about locker room oratory as 21st Century coaches channel Knute Rockne to rally the players before heading out on the field for the Championship game.

Yet, if you ask many coaches and athletes what the pre-game speech is like prior to most big games you would learn that the talk was rather subdued and matter of fact.

The reason for this is athletes don’t need to get motivated for the championship game, they know what it means to get to that level of success, what the stakes are, and how unlikely it is they will have the opportunity to play at that level ever again.

Often, you find the real motivational talks take place at key moments along the journey to the big game.

The best coaches know when to pull out the motivational talk, when to let the team leaders speak, and when to trust the professionals they hired to motivate themselves.

In 10-years of coaching business leaders it seems that this is probably the number one area they struggle with most trying to maximize motivation from their team of employees.

This leadership communication challenge hovers around what I call the “3 T’s of Leadership Motivational Communication:”

• Texture (what to say)

• Timing (when to say it),and most importantly,

• Tone (how to say it)

 

Even when the 3 T’s are aligned properly, sometimes its still not enough to deliver the desired results. This is due to other factors in the work environment impacting motivation. Often, there are de-motivators sabotaging the best motivational sessions.

Human motivation is a dicey, sometimes confusing, and always a multi-faceted thing too, many organizational leaders ignore and just keep spewing forth the Rocknesque oratory, with little to show for it in terms of results.

There are six different motivational theories that are always at play in work environments that unless a business leader understands, the confusion and frustration will continue.

 

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8 Pillars of Leadership Wisdom

Leadership Wisdom

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients – the president of a professional services firm. We had a collaborative coaching conversation discussing the comp0nents of wisdom..

My executive coaching client and I discussed how judgment, social intelligence and core values have influenced his ability to make wise decisions. I am coaching my client to tap into his wisdom and creativity.

8 Pillars of Wisdom

In Stephen S. Hall's book, Wisdom: from Philosophy to Neuroscience (Vintage 2011), the author breaks the concept of wisdom into its most salient cognitive and emotional components which he calls the "neural pillars of wisdom," in order to understand the science behind each. The book is recommended for better understanding the "science of wisdom" and its philosophical and psychological roots.

  1. Emotional regulation
  2. Knowing what's important: values and judgment
  3. Moral reasoning
  4. Compassion
  5. Humility
  6. Patience
  7. Altruism
  8. Dealing with uncertainty and complexity

Business Intelligence

According to Tom Davenport, professor of information technology at Babson College in Massachusetts, "Business intelligence is the systematic use of information about your business to understand, report on and predict different aspects of performance."

Davenport argues that sage leadership is the most important factor in cultivating this organizational thought process, citing as examples Jeff Bezos of Amazon.com, Inc., Gary Loveman of Harrah's Entertainments, Inc., and Reed Hastings of Netflix, Inc.

Warren Buffet, the investor, is known for his financial wisdom built upon a foundation of expert accounting knowledge.However, his true brilliance stems from a deep understanding of people and human nature.

Social Intelligence

A less appreciated aspect of corporate skill is social wisdom. Often termed "human relations," understanding and incorporating the diversity of "people factors" into business decisions is usually undervalued. So much of our physical and psychic energy is depleted by conflicts, stress, and competitive interpersonal tensions in business.

We know this, yet we continue to measure business success by the usual marketplace yardsticks of sales, profits, dividends and other bottom line results. We forget the other issues, such as job satisfaction, quality of workplace, sense of personal fulfillment, and innovative and creative opportunities.

What if we exercised executive wisdom by focusing on maximizing the potentials of both the organization and its employees? How would that impact leadership decisions? How many companies have floundered by focusing on the numbers while ignoring their people?

Almost any manager knows that a major part of their time is spent soothing, inspiring and fixing social relationships in the workplace in order to improve performance. Managing with farsightedness in the workplace requires extra effort in order to keep individuals working together smoothly. Therefore the entire group unifies around a greater common goal.

Business Compassion

Is compassion compatible with good business? Recent studies suggest that those businesses that maintain a right-minded and socially aware focus develop strong and healthy bottom lines. One study compared financial results of companies with higher commitments to charitable giving and found they were more profitable.

A mutual fund run by Dover Management of Greenwich, Connecticut is based on investments in companies known for charitable giving. The idea for the fund is based on the assumption that only financially healthy companies can afford to be generous. The fund exceeded the returns on the S&P 500 index in a recent year.

Often organizations that are characterized as other-centered are run by socially compassionate CEOs. John D. Rockefeller spent as much time making money as giving it away. Nike and Avon have turned their philanthropic initiatives into brand awareness initiatives, which seem to please both employees and customers while adding to profits.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to search for their executive wisdom? Wise leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to make wise decisions.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “How have I exercised executive wisdom?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help your search for executive wisdom. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

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Executive Wisdom for Smart Decision-Making - Wisdom in Action

Executive Wisdom for Smart Decision-Making

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients – the president of a professional services firm. We had an enlightening coaching conversation that revolved around whether wisdom can be developed or learned.

My executive coaching client and I discussed how knowledge, social intelligence and experience have influenced his ability to make wise decisions. I am coaching my client to tap into his wisdom and creativity.

Wisdom in Action

Prudent decision-making lies at the heart of wisdom but it's not the whole story. In order to make a smart decision, a wise leader must draw upon intellectual, emotional, and social comprehension. To do so, one must:

  • Gather information
  • Discern reality from artifice
  • Evaluate and edit the accumulating knowledge
  • Listen with both heart and mind
  • Consider what is morally right
  • Weigh what is socially just
  • Consider others as much as self
  • Think about the here and now
  • Consider future impact

In times of crisis, however, wisdom sometimes demands the paradoxical decision to resist action or judgment.

"Some of the wisest and most devout men have lived avoiding all noticeable actions."
~ Michel de Montaigne, French philosopher

There are no workbooks that, if you buy and read them, will turn you into an outstanding leader. Reading about wisdom will certainly open your mind to many possibilities, but to read about it without taking action is a fruitless endeavor.

When called upon in any challenging situation, no matter how trivial, if you slow down long enough to ask yourself the question, "What would be the wisest thing to do?" you will already be moving closer to making a more appropriate and apt decision.

The question allows you to slow down the sense of urgency long enough to consider other people, other issues, and future implications. Instead of reaching for immediate solutions to take away the burning problem, you have an opportunity to consider future needs down the road.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to search for their executive wisdom? Wise leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to make good decisions.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “What would be the wisest thing to do here?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help your search for executive wisdom. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

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Great Leaders Master “The 3 Levels of High-Performance Leadership Communication”

National Hockey League Hall of Famer Mark Messier is recognized as one of the greatest leaders in the history of professional team sports. This reputation is backed by the fact Messier is the only player to captain two separate teams to the Stanley Cup Championship.

 

So, when Messier talks leadership, people should pay attention.

 

After winning his sixth Stanley Cup in 1994, and the first for his New York Rangers in 54 years, Messier was quoted in a Sports Illustrated article on how he gets the most out of the players as a team captain:

 

“To lead effectively, you have to have the trust of those on your team, and to do that you have to find a way to connect with them, to find common ground with every individual. It’s a people issue, not a sports (or business/job) issue. The way to find that common thread is compassion.”

 

Messier’s quote describes the highest level of leadership communication, what I call Level 3 Leadership Communication.

 

As Messier’s quote reveals, Level 3 Leadership Communicationis about connecting with the individuals on a team so that the leader understands what uniquely motivates each.

 

One of the roadblocks to a leader embracing and engaging in Level 3 Leadership Communicationcomes from one of the earliest lessons children learn in life, something called the “Golden Rule.”

 

To recount that lesson from early childhood, the “Golden Rule” states, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

 

On the surface it seems like a great approach.

 

The challenge is that statement comes with a pre-supposition that every person a leader leads will have the same interests, desires and motivations. And those interests, desires, and motivates will remain constant throughout the term the individual is working with you.

 

These assumptions regularly cause misunderstandings between leaders and their respective team members, which causes the erosion of motivation, morale and trust.

 

An approach that champion leaders like Messier apply is called “the Champion Leaders’ Rule,” which states, “Do unto others as they want to be done unto.”

 

This approach takes a concerted effort to invest time and energy in getting to know the personal aspirations and motivations of the individuals on the team, as Messier noted. But as Messier’s six Stanley Cup Championships attest, the return on that investment can be tremendous.

 

There is a strong caveat to applying Leadership Communication Level 3, however, because a leader that has not invested time and energy in building the foundation in Leadership Communication Level 1(self-awareness and self-communication) will do more to de-motivate team members and will sabotage the trust and commitment necessary to generate high-performance from individual team members.

 

To prove my point above, think about how many 1:1 ‘performance review’ discussions fail to generate the positive feelings and the performance improvements discussed in the session with a team member. This is often the case even when a leader gets “agreement” from the team member regarding the improvements that need to be developed.

 

Too many performance review discussions end up creating animosity, distrust and confusion instead of the intended outcome of higher performance.

 

When a leader invests in themselves in Leadership Communication Level 1to:

 

• become self-aware of how they want and need to show up as a leader, and

• how they need to project themselves when they are in front of their team members (Leadership Communication Level 2), plus

• develop their personal internal and external communication, either individually or collectively,

 

the results received from the team will grow exponentially, and it will happen with you spending significantly less time trying to motivate the team as a unit because the team members will take ownership and responsibility of the effort.

 

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Executive Wisdom for True Leadership - Finding Wisdom

Executive Wisdom

I was recently working with one of my San Francisco Bay Area executive coaching clients – the president of a professional services firm.We talked about wisdom’s role in true leadership.

My executive coaching client and I discussed how both knowledge and experience have influenced his ability to make wise decisions.I am coaching my client to tap into his wisdom in the face of uncertainty and ambiguity.

Finding Wisdom

Fortunately, every time we think about wisdom and make an effort to pause and contemplate a potential role for true leadership in whatever we are about to say or do, we move a step closer to achieving it. But unfortunately, many leaders don't take time to consider the larger issues when short term profits are at stake.

Wisdom in the workplace typically implies two distinct areas of wise behavior:

  1. The wisdom of corporate decision-making.
    1. Knowing what information to use in decision-making.
    2. Creating a culture of knowledge in order to acquire that information in a timely fashion.
    3. Assessing it in both short- and long-term frameworks.
  2. Reaping the financial rewards that come with shrewd financial choices.

In many cases, business wisdom involves plain hard work, coupled with intelligence in several domains: knowledge, social intelligence, emotional regulation, compassion and concern for the common good.

Wisdom is more an ideal aspiration than a state of mind or a pattern of behavior that we customarily employ. The mere act of thinking about wisdom nudges us closer to it. When you encounter a problem or dilemma, if you ask yourself, "What would be the wisest thing to do here?" you increase your chances of making a judicious choice.

It's rarely that simple. How do we make complex, complicated decisions and choices in the face of uncertainty and ambiguity? What makes some of these decisions so clearly sound that we intuitively recognize them as a moment of human wisdom?

Ultimately, without an understanding of the elements that comprise wisdom, it eludes us.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to search for their executive wisdom? Wise leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to make good decisions.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I make shrewd financial choices based on executive wisdom?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help your search for executive wisdom. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist, executive coach and trusted advisor to senior leadership teams. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies and law firms assess, select, coach, and retain emotionally intelligent leaders. Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com  

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

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Just Because You Are “Listening” Doesn’t Mean Your People Feel “Heard”

The very first project I ever worked on to improve leadership and workplace communication, I did the only thing I knew how to do in starting the project. That was to gather information from team members.

In interview after interview, I heard the same lament. It sounded like this, “we’ve had a lot of meetings in the past where everyone shared all sorts of great ideas, but there was never any follow through or feedback on them.”

Over time, people in this company stopped offering their ideas because the impression senior management gave back by not following through or offering feedback in return was that the ideas were not valued.

This situation has repeated itself many times over the last six years since I’ve been working with organizational leaders to improve their workplace communication.

So, the next time you call a team meeting, or ask for ideas from your employees (regardless of their level), you must make sure you follow up on the ideas and let those sharing the ideas know the status and what they should expect.

This doesn’t mean you have to apply all the ideas, you just need to provide feedback as to what you plan to do with each of the specific ideas. This should be done even if it means a decision was made that the idea was not appropriate and could not be implemented. All you need to do is provide the reasons behind the decision so that those supplying the ideas know that their efforts were at least considered.

This will allow your people to feel “heard” and “valued.” Without the closing of the feedback loop, its actually worse than if you didn’t even ask in the first place, because it comes off as disingenuous and gimmicky. It will gradually erode trust and an interest in engaging and providing ideas again in the future.

If you want to begin creating a highly motivated and engaged workforce, this is one of the easiest and least expensive ways to get started. Don't just pay lipservice, pay attention!

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