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Better Listening for Mindful Leaders

"In dealing with those who are undergoing great suffering, if you feel 'burnout' setting in, if you feel demoralized and exhausted, it is best, for the sake of everyone, to withdraw and restore yourself. The point is to have a long-term perspective." - Dalai Lama

I recently spoke with the HR Director of a San Francisco Bay Area company regarding providing executive coaching for the company CEO and other leaders. She asked some very insightful questions to determine fit. She wanted to know how I worked with different personality styles, and my methods for initiating change in thinking and behavior.

The HR Director and I spoke about my approach to coaching, and my belief that possessing a psychological understanding of human behavior based on neuroscience and self-awareness are important competencies for coaching executives. We also spoke of the need for her organization to create a high involvement culture where innovation and creativity flourishes.

The HR Director is interested in collaborating with me to help senior executives improve their listening skills, and get the most out of their executive coaching programs. We further discussed how company leaders could benefit by working with an executive development expert, and emotional intelligence and mindfulness-based executive coach.

"If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is.  If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there's room to hear more subtle things - that's when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It's a discipline; you have to practice it." - Steve Jobs

The Three Levels of Awareness

Mindful leaders are focused and attentive to other people. Their rapt attention allows them to be fully engaged in a conversation without the mind wandering. It takes mindful presence.

Level One Awareness has an internal focus on oneself. You may only half hear and see what is happening around you as your internal train of thought monopolizes your attention
Level Two Awareness has an external focus on the person or people you are with. You are fully open and receptive to colleagues. You are not distracted by internal thoughts, and are in the here-and-now rather than speculating on what will happen next.
Level Three Awareness is directed towards the person or people you are with, but goes beyond this. You don’t just pick up what they are doing or saying; you pick up on all sorts of other things - body language, inflections in the voice, pauses and hesitations, dynamics. You have a sixth sense and an increased sense of presence.

Listening Inquiry Questions

The following are some questions you might ask in an attentive and mindful workplace conversation. Of course, you need a trusting relationship.

  1. I am getting the perception you are not listening.  If I am off, let me know.  If I am on, let me know.
  2. If the person says “yes…you are right…I am not listening….I am distracted”, then say “How does your not listening during our conversation also show up in your work and personal life?”
  3. Name the emotion you feel when someone is not listening.
  4. Paint the scenario for me. When someone is truly listening, how do you know it?
  5. What great listeners are your role models? How can you pick up on some of their listening traits?
  6. What would be the perfect environment that would allow you to listen deeply to others?
  7. What habits do you need to change in order to strengthen your listening skills?
  8. If you do have a lack of focus, have you spoken to your physician about this?  If not, when will you?
  9. What would be possible for your team/your relationships at home/your company if you were listening to the greatest level possible?
  10. What one skill could you improve, starting today, that would improve your listening?
  11. When someone comes to you with a complaint, if you get defensive, what is your plan to sit calmly and listen? (Do you need to take a break to the bathroom to gather yourself together, etc.?)
  12. What gifts and assets do you have which can help you with your listening skills?
  13. What do you believe about listening? What is your philosophy on the topic of listening?
  14. What is the dollar amount you may lose if you don’t improve your listening skills?

Activities to Enhance Listening

Self-Observation: Ask the person to observe himself listening without judgment and to write, blog or podcast about his view.

Busy City: Ask the person to sit in a busy city or busy restaurant, and when something is spoken that “perks him up”, ask him to jot down what the subject was about.

Non Interruption, Pause, Question: For one week, ask the person to not interrupt the speaker, to pause for 3 seconds after the speaker finishes talking and then to stay in question mode.

Clarification/Repeating Exercise: Ask the person to practice with a trusted family member or colleague.  Ask the person to listen to a story without interruption, and then repeat back what he heard. Ask for feedback from the speaker.

Assessments for Better Listening

Time Mastery Profile: Download a Sample Time Mastery Profile

Personal Listening Profile: Download a Sample Listening Profile

The Listening Oral Interview 360 Degree Feedback: Download a Sample Listening 360

Additional Resources

Look Like You’re Listening by Marshall Goldsmith

Are You Listening to Me? by Richard Bierck

The Art of Listening by Eric Frohmm

Are You Really Listening by Paul J., Ph.D. Donoghue and Mary E. Siegel

Listening is Critical in Today’s Multicultural Workplace by Roger O. Crockett

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to become better listeners? Mindful leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I an attentive listener who stays focused in the moment?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their transformational high performance leadership development program.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

 

 

© Copyright 2013 Dr. Maynard Brusman
 

Categories: 

Listening Skills for Mindful Leaders

Listening Skills for Mindful Leaders

"In dealing with those who are undergoing great suffering, if you feel 'burnout' setting in, if you feel demoralized and exhausted, it is best, for the sake of everyone, to withdraw and restore yourself. The point is to have a long-term perspective." - Dalai Lama

I recently spoke with the HR Director of a San Francisco Bay Area company regarding providing executive coaching for the company CEO and other leaders. She asked some very insightful questions to determine fit. She wanted to know how I worked with different personality styles, and my methods for initiating change in thinking and behavior.

The HR Director and I spoke about my approach to coaching, and my belief that possessing a psychological understanding of human behavior based on neuroscience and mindfulness are important competencies for coaching executives. We also spoke of the need for her organization to create a high involvement culture where innovation and creativity flourishes.

The HR Director is interested in collaborating with me to help senior executives develop focus, and improve their listening skills to get the most out of their executive coaching programs. We further discussed how company leaders could benefit by working with an emotional intelligence and mindfulness-based executive coach.

"If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is.  If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there's room to hear more subtle things - that's when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It's a discipline; you have to practice it." - Steve Jobs

The Four Levels of Listening:

Level 1: The person somewhat hears the words but is off in la-la land

Level 2:The person is listening, but he sees no connection in the speaker and himself.

Level 3: Active Listening: The person is listening, being compassionate, starting to “walk in the speaker’s shoes” and is starting to see some connections in his own life.

Level 4: Global Listening: The person is 100% connected, engaged and is seeing how the speaker’s story is affecting his greater world.

The 5 Listening Styles:

  • Appreciative: Listens in a relaxed manner, seeks enjoyment, entertainment, or inspiration.
  • Empathic:Listens without judging, is supportive of the speaker, and learns from the experiences of others.
  • Comprehensive: Listens to organize and make sense of information by understanding relationships among ideas.
  • Discerning: Listens to get complete information, understand the main message, and determine important details.
  • Evaluative: Listens in order to make a decision based on information provided and may accept or reject messages based on personal beliefs.

Coaching Questions to Ask if You Feel a Person is Not Listening

  1. I am getting the perception you are not listening. If I am off, let me know. If I am on, let me know.
  2. If the person says “yes…you are right…I am not listening….I am distracted”, then say “How does your not listening during the coaching conversation also show up in your work and personal life?”
  3. Name the emotion you feel when someone is not listening.
  4. Paint the scenario for me. When someone is truly listening, how do you know it?
  5. What great listeners are your role models? How can you pick up on some of their listening traits?
  6. What would be the perfect environment that would allow you to listen deeply to others?
  7. What habits do you need to change in order to strengthen your listening skills?
  8. If you do have a lack of focus, have you spoken to your physician about this?  If not, when will you?
  9. What would be possible for your team/your relationships at home/your company if you were listening to the greatest level possible?
  10. What one skill could you improve, starting today, that would improve your listening?
  11. When someone comes to you with a complaint, if you get defensive, what is your plan to sit calmly and listen? (Do you need to take a break to the bathroom to gather yourself together, etc.?)
  12. What gifts and assets do you have which can help you with your listening skills?
  13. What do you believe about listening? What is your philosophy on the topic of listening?
  14. What is the dollar amount you may lose if you don’t improve your listening skills

"The happiness we discover in life ... is the discovery of the capacity to have a loving, free and wise relationship with all of life." - Jack Kornfield, A Path With Heart

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to grow their listening skills? Mindful leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “How do I get the most out of executive coaching to focus, and grow my listening capability?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their emotional intelligence-focused leadership development program.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

Categories: 

Mindful Listening for Emotionally Intelligent Leaders

Listening for Emotionally Intelligent Leaders

"Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, 'Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?' Actually who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small doesn't serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And when we let our light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others." -- Marianne Williamson

I recently spoke with the HR Director of a San Francisco Bay Area company regarding providing executive coaching for the company CEO and other leaders. She asked some very insightful questions to determine fit. She wanted to know how I worked with different personality styles, and my methods for initiating change in thinking and behavior.

The HR Director and I spoke about my approach to coaching, and my belief that possessing a psychological understanding of human behavior based on neuroscience and business acumen are important competencies for coaching executives. We also spoke of the need for her organization to create a high involvement culture where innovation and creativity flourishes.

The HR Director is interested in collaborating with me to help senior executives improve their listening skills, and get the most out of their executive coaching programs. We further discussed how company leaders could benefit by working with an executive development expert, and emotional intelligence-based executive coach.

Mindful Listening skills

World renowned psychologist Carl Rogers was famous for his emphasis on listening to people with positive self-regard. Most people want to feel that someone truly listens to them and seeks to understand.

"Let me move on to a second learning that I would like to share with you. I like to be heard. A number of times in my life I have felt myself bursting with insoluble problems, or going round and round in tormented circles or, during one period, overcome by feelings of worthlessness and despair.

I think I have been more fortunate than most in finding, at these times, individuals who have been able to hear me and thus to rescue me from the chaos of my feelings, individuals who have been able to hear my meanings a little more deeply than I have known them. These persons have heard me without judging me, diagnosing me, appraising me, evaluating me. They have just listened and clarified and responded to me at all the levels at which I was communicating. 

I can testify that when you are in psychological distress and someone really hears you without passing judgment on you, without trying to take responsibility for you, without trying to mold you, it feels damn good! At these times it has relaxed the tension in me. It has permitted me to bring out the frightening feelings, the guilts, the despair, the confusions that have been a part of my experience. When I have been listened to and when I have been heard,

I am able to re-perceive my world in a new way and to go on. It is astonishing how elements that seem insoluble become soluble when someone listens, how confusions that seem irremediable turn into relatively clear flowing streams when one is heard. I have deeply appreciated the times that I have experienced this sensitive, empathic, concentrated listening."  Carl Rogers Experiences in Communication http://j.mp/V88gdn 

The Listening Process

It has been my executive coaching and consulting experience that a leader or manager invests 80% of her day in the listening process. As an executive coach, I have also observed that many leaders shy away or back down from engaging in tough conversations with their people. These conversations are often extremely critical to the success or lack of success in interpersonal relationships. My purpose is to hold you as highly capable of overcoming some of your greatest fears by becoming a better listener.

The following delineates the emotionally intelligent listening process. Mindful leaders are good listeners.

Active Listening

  • The leader is actively listening
  • The leader is engaged
  • The leader is asking relevant questions to the topic being discussed
  • The leader is still, quiet and calm
  • The leader is patient with questions and suggestions
  • The leader can accurately restate or clarify the discussion

NOT listening

  • The leader cuts people off
  • The leader interrupts constantly
  • The leader finishes sentences for others
  • The leader cannot clarify or repeat the conversation
  • The leader is multi-tasking
  • You can observe or hear pencil tapping, computer keyboard tapping, chair squeaking
  • The leader completely misses the point of the conversation
  • The leader switches subjects out of nowhere
  • The leader listens to some people and ignores others

Poor listening skills causes

  • ADD/ADHD
  • Arrogance
  • Narcissism
  • Leader is a selective listener (only listens to people who and subjects which interest him)
  • Depression/anxiety
  • Leader is defensive
  • Lack of patience (trying to fast forward the conversation)
  • Overcommitted
  • Insensitive to others and their “stories”
  • The leader really just does not know how to listen

Impact on the company

  • Important facts are completely missed
  • Communication breaks down
  • Employees feel they are not being “heard”, which can lead to attrition
  • Clients leave the company, because they feel leadership does not listen to their concerns

Modeling listening

  • Be patient, quiet and calm
  • Remove all distractions (close your email, turn off cell phones)
  • Don’t finish others’ sentences
  • Don’t interrupt (unless someone is taking you down a rabbit hole and then warn him by saying “I am going to interrupt you”)
  • Clarify by saying “Let me see if I have this straight”…then, rephrase what was said to make sure you heard what the person said

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to become better listeners? Mindful leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I focus on listening to others?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their transformational high performance leadership development program.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

© Copyright 2013 Dr. Maynard Brusman
 

Categories: 

5 Ways Marketing Can Turbocharge Sales

Sellers who win sell radically differently than sellers who come in second place. That’s according to What Sales Winners Do Differently, a new research report from RAIN Group, a sales training and consulting firm. In its research, RAIN Group analyzed more than 700 business-to-business purchases to find out what separates sales winners from second-place finishers.

As I reviewed the results, it struck me just how much more marketing can do to help turbocharge results in this new world of selling.

Here are five things RAIN Group found that sales winners do better than second-place finishers, as well as how marketing and sales can collaborate to maximize sales results:

1. Sellers who win connect the dots between buyer needs and the seller’s solutions.

Mike Schultz, the coauthor of the report, notes the Harvard Business Review recently published an article titled, “The End of Solution Sales.” RAIN Group’s research, however, found quite the opposite. In many cases, sellers are often left to their own devices to make the connection between customers’ needs and how their products and services can act as solutions to those needs.

Yet, in most organizations, the marketers are assigned responsibility for analyzing and communicating how their company’s offerings can improve their customers’ condition. Marketers should create tools and playbooks that do this basic work for the sales team. These tools should include a grid of company offerings, how these offerings solve needs, the impact (or benefit) of solving those needs, and questions sellers can ask to uncover those needs. This has a huge impact on a seller’s ability to connect the dots between needs and solutions.

2. Sellers who win persuade buyers they will achieve worthwhile results.

Case studies that demonstrate how your company created client results are gold to sellers. When marketing can provide these studies, the new buyers will a) see the results are possible, b) desire the results for themselves, and c) go a long way to being convinced they can achieve similar results.

3. Sellers who win minimize buyers’ perception of risk.

This was a surprising finding. As Schultz said to me, “The concept of risk reduction has shot up in recent years in its importance to winning sales. Buyers have been burned in the past by promises not kept and are still feeling the sting of the Great Recession. Risk reduction is more important than ever.” While the seller is essential in building trust with the buyer, marketing needs to be responsible for its brand, thought leadership, and communicating a history of results that build trust in the company itself and its offerings.

4. Sellers who win convince buyers they are the best option.

In a word, this is differentiation. Marketers can have a huge impact on helping sales communicate how their offerings--and their company--are superior to other options. Getting competitive positioning right takes great effort, but produces great results. It’s often better for marketing to do it once and allow the whole sales team to leverage it, than it is for the sales team to try to get it done themselves in their spare time.

5. Sellers who win collaborate with buyers.

Consultants from CEB published The Challenger Sale, which recommends that sellers focus on challenging (and generally being more antagonistic) toward buyers. I wrote about this topic on FastCompany.com earlier this year. RAIN Group found the opposite in their research. RAIN researchers found that collaboration, not confrontation, gets better sales results. Creating events where buyers, prospects, and sellers can connect offline provides many possibilities. Blogs, private live events, and breakfasts; online meeting technologies such as Google Hangout; and online collaboration communities (like what CDW did here to improve sales prospecting) provide marketing leaders with myriad options.

All marketers should read What Sales Winners Do Differently. Consider sending the brief report to your sales and marketing teams. The more they know about how sales professionals and buyer behaviors are changing, the more they can sell like the top performers.

When marketing and sales collaborate with prospects, the race to the finish line happens with more ease. Don’t make selling more challenging than it needs to be.

What to Read Next:

"Trends In B2B Sales And Marketing From 'The Challenger Sale' "

"Why CMOs Also Have To Be Thought Leaders"

"Four Essentials For Modern B2B Marketers"


[Image: Flickr user Pier-Luc Bergeron]

Categories: 

The Difference Between Leaders and Managers

"Don’t tell me you had a wonderful meeting with me. Tell me what you’re going to do on Monday that’s different." -- Peter Drucker

“It has become popular to talk about us being over-managed and under-led. I believe we are now over-led and under-managed.”~Henry Mintzberg, Simply Managing: What Managers Do—and Can Do Better(Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2013)

Much has been written about the difference between leaders and managers.

“Leaders are people who do the right thing,” noteleadership experts Warren Bennis and Joan Goldsmith in Learning to Lead: A Workbook on Becoming a Leader (Basic Books, 2003). “Managers are people who do things right.”

As they further explain: “To manage means to bring about, to accomplish, to have charge of or responsibility for, to conduct. Leading is influencing, guiding in a direction, course, action, opinion. The distinction is crucial.”

While this distinction is correct, it has unintended negative effects. Some leaders now believe their job is about coming up with big ideas. They dismiss executing these ideas, engaging in conversation and planning the details as mere “management” work.

Worse still, many leaders cite this distinction as the reason why they’re entitled to avoid the hard work of learning about the people they lead, the processes their companies use and the customers they serve.

What Managers Actually Do

According to traditional management theorists, managers are supposed to plan, organize, coordinate and control. In truth, the pressures of reacting to urgent matters supplant most reflection and planning.

Managers respond to daily crises, take on too much work, operate with continuous interruptions and make instant decisions. They have no time to step back and consider bigger issues—a problem that often causes them to act with superficial, fragmented information.

In a classic November 2003 Harvard Business Review article, “Manager’s Job: Folklore and Fact,” Mintzberg outlines 10 daily management roles that fall within three broad categories:

1. Interpersonal Category (3 Roles)

a. Figurehead. You represent your group to your organization and the community at large.

b. Leader. You hire, train and motivate employees.

c. Liaison. You maintain contact with colleagues and stakeholders outside your immediate chain of command.

2. Informational Category (3 Roles)

a. Monitor. You leverage your personal network to scan the environment for vital information.

b. Disseminator. You feed information to subordinates who lack your access to critical data.

c. Spokesperson. You provide information on behalf of your unit to senior management and outside organizations.

3. Decisional Category(4 Roles)

a. Entrepreneur. You initiate projects to improve your unit’s processes or profits.

b. Disturbance Handler. You manage crises precipitated by employees, customers, suppliers, systems or accidents.

c. Resource Allocator. You decide who will get what, coordinate the impact of interrelated decisions and allocate managerial time.

d. Negotiator. You use strategic information to resolve grievances, establish contracts and promote shared decisions.

If you want to improve your managerial skills, take a good look at what actually happens each day:

  • How do you spend your time?
  • n which activities are you engaged?
  • Are you really operating in all 10 pivotal roles?
  • Where do you need help?

5 Effective Managerial Mindsets

Mintzberg further describes five critical managerial mindsets:

  1. Managing oneself (reflective mindset). A reflective mindset allows you to be thoughtful, examine familiar experiences in a new light, and set the stage for developing  innovative products and services.
  2. Managing organizations (analytical mindset)An analytical mindset ensures that you make decisions based on in-depth data.
  3. Managing context (worldly mindset)A worldly mindset helps you operate in diverse regions, with the cultural and social insights needed to serve varied customers.
  4. Managing relationships (collaborative mindset)A collaborative mindset fosters relationship-building among the individuals and teams who produce your products and services. Instead of managing people, focus on managing your relationships with them.
  5. Managing change (action mindset)An action mindset energizes you to create and expedite the best plans for achieving strategic goals.

Expecting managers to excel in all five managerial mindsets misses Mintzberg’s point. Managers are people, not superheroes. But when they’re at least somewhat familiar with each way of thinking, they can more easily recognize which skills are needed and appropriately switch mindsets.

The Care and Feeding of Managers

CEOs who wish to retain top managers need to see them as important resources and nurture them accordingly. Managers are the single greatest factor in retaining employees (Gallup Organization, State of the American Workplace, 2012).

CEOs should provide their managers with development opportunities and professional coaching. Companies that offer coaching enjoy marked performance improvements—not only from managers, but from those who report to them, as well.

Executive coaching grants managers time to practice introspection, which is necessary for ongoing learning. Job pressures frequently drive managers to take on too much work, encourage interruptions, respond quickly to every stimulus, seek the tangible and avoid the abstract, and make decisions in small increments. Effective managers consciously deal with these pressures.

Becoming a More Effective Manager

Conquer the challenges associated with managerial demands by developing introspection skills and insights:

  • Be aware of which roles you naturally prefer. Don’t ignore those that make you uncomfortable. Stretch beyond your usual limits.
  • ·Be sure to disseminate information to others so you can delegate more and help your people grow more self-sufficient.
  • Avoid the traps of superficial decision-making because of time pressures. Make use of other experts and analysts.
  • Schedule time for the tasks you believe are most important. Don’t let daily pressures crowd out time for reflection, innovation or other critical values.

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to help mangers improve their managerial skills? Does your organization provide executive coaching for managers who need to learn about the people they lead, the processes their companies use and the customers they serve? Enlightened managers tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Are our people over-led and under-managed?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more effective teams.

John Lennon once said, “Life is something that happens to you when you’re busy making other plans.” Of course, you can listen to Woody Allen, who famously said: “Half of life is just showing up.”

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help managers be more effective. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman
http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

© Copyright 2013 Dr. Maynard Brusman

 

 


 

Categories: 

Holistic Executive Coaching–The Power of Habit

Mindful leaders know that serving others is the key to better business results, greater team involvement, happier followers and a sustainable future.

Act Mindfully

Many of the leaders I see in my emotional intelligence-based executive coaching practice of over twenty-five years are working long hours and are stressed-out. Some of my clients complain of low energy and exhaustion. They frequently are sleep deprived. Getting adequate sleep is an enormous help in restoring mental clarity and the drive to succeed.

My holistic approach to coaching is to work with the whole person, so upon request I weave into my leadership development work the importance of stress resiliency, mindfulness, daily meditation practice, exercise and proper nutrition. I recommend clients see their physician if they have specific health concerns, and make referrals to nutritionists, fitness trainers and other health experts when appropriate.

Act mindfully and savor your relationships at work and at home. Create the powerful habit of “pacing” yourself to restore energy, build resiliency and create well-being.

"Respect yourself and others will respect you."–Confucius

The Power of Habit

Watch this hilarious video:

Bob Newhart-Stop Ithttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ow0lr63y4Mw

In his thought provoking book “The Power of Habit”, Charles Duhigg, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, tackles an important reality head on. That is, people succeed when they identify patterns that shape their lives--and learn how to change them. This idea--that you can indeed change your habits--draws on recent research in experimental psychology, neurology, and applied psychology.

Duhigg looks at the habits of individuals, how habits operate in the brain, howcompanies use them, and how retailers use habits to manipulate buying habits. The author's main contention is that "you have the freedom and responsibility" to remake your habits. He says "the most addicted alcoholics can become sober. The most dysfunctional companies can transform themselves. A high school dropout can become a successful manager."

"The Habit Loop" explains exactly what a habit is. According to the author, habits make up 40% of our daily routine.  The process within our brains is a three-step loop.  First, there is a cue, a trigger that tells your brain to go into automatic mode and which behavior to use. Second, there is the routine, which can be physical or mental or emotional. Finally, there is the reward.

Your daily habits create the foundation of your life–your health, wealth, happiness, productivity, quality of relationships, and energy level. You can become more mindful creating the intention to interrupt patterns that don’t serve you. Establish positive habits that lead to a happy and prosperous life.

You create habits as an efficiency mechanism. Neuroscience research tells us that the brain quickly transforms as many tasks and behaviors as possible into habits so that we can do them without thinking. This frees up the brain to deal with new challenges. But first, we have to integrate the new habit and that can feel challenging.

Think about when you start a new activity. Your brain works hard to integrate it into your life, processing huge amounts of new information as you progress through the activity. As soon as you understand how it works, your behavior starts becoming automatic and the amount of mental effort required to perform the activity decreases.

The best way to approach creating positive new habits that will last is to take baby steps bringing them into your life one at a time. This gives you the opportunity to repeat the habit over and over until it is a part of your automatic behavior, and also allows you to focus the extra brainpower required for the habit on one or few activities so you aren’t overwhelmed. Then when your habit is automatic, you can add another one.

It might seem counter-intuitive, and that this approach will bring slow results. But, when you consider that studies show most people only make changes for a short amount of time before giving up, this approach actually brings results fast. Plus, you can say goodbye to that discouraging yo-yo cycle of starting and then breaking habits! Dieting is a good example of an intention that often goes awry, and demotivates people.

Keystone Habits

Watch this video! http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4H0fTwtPLfo

It wasn’t the trip to Cairo that had caused the shift, scientists were convinced, or the divorce or desert trek. It was that Lisa had focused on changing just one habit—smoking—at first. Everyone in the study had gone through a similar process. By focusing on one pattern—what is known as a “keystone habit”—Lisa had taught herself how to reprogram the other routines in her life, as well.”
~ Charles Duhigg in “The Power of Habit”

This is my favorite Big Idea in the book. The basic idea: There’s a habit that when we change it will have the greatest positive impact on our lives. It’s a KEYSTONE habit. Keystones are good.

As the Apple dictionary tells us, a keystone is “a central stone at the summit of an arch, locking the whole together.”

So...what’s your keystone habit? What’s the #1 thing you could change that would have the most positive impact on your life? Is it quitting smoking? No longer drinking? Drastically reducing your internet time? Getting your inbox to zero? Meditating every day? Think about it. And pick one.

This is a keystone habit for me that I commit to changing: Frequency of checking e-mail

So, let’s look at my Cue + Routine + Reward.

Old pattern:Cue = Checking my e-mail first thing in the morning. Routine = Tell myself there might be something important that needs my immediate attention. Reward = Convinced myself that there are no problems lurking out there for me.

New pattern:Cue = Getting out of bed bright and early ready to get a fast start to my day. Routine = Tell myself how much more productive I will be getting some “real work” (writing a blog post or article etc.) before checking my e-mail. Reward = Honored my commitment to be more focused, strategic and productive. Stopped fooling myself that checking e-mail incessantly is helping me reach my goals for the day!

Back to you: What’s your keystone habit? And your Cue + Routine + Reward?

The book goes into more detail that will be very helpful for you as you look to re-shape your habits, but let’s take a quick inventory:

My keystone habit:___________________________________

My current Cue:_______________________________________

My current Routine:____________________________________

My current Reward:__________________________________

My new Cue: ________________________________________

My new Routine:______________________________________

My new Reward:____

 

Eat Healthy

"We don't stop playing games because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing games." ­
-- George Bernard Shaw

What high performance leaders eat is so important to their success. A number of my clients seeking better nutrition have found reading the books “Eat to Live” by Joel Fuhrman, MD, and "The Perfect Health Diet” by Paul Jaminet and Shou-Ching Shih Jaminet, and changing their eating habits very helpful to restore energy and vitality.

Jack Lallane, the fitness guru recommended mostly eating “live food”. Processed or man-made food may not have helped him in his 90’s pull all of those boats in the water!

  

“Real Age" Health Survey

I recently took the "Real Age" Health Survey and found it a pretty good indicator of my health habits, which is vitally important as we get older and hopefully healthier and wiser.
I'm really 58 not 66. My goal is to be 24. I can dream big and so can you!

A number of my executive coaching clients have found taking the health survey a real wake-up call! You can take the free survey at http://www.doctoroz.com/realage

Sustainable leaders take time for self-reflection, model healthy behaviors and flourish. They seek constant reinvention.  A bit of luck can help too! Are your health habits serving you?

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders? Sustainable leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to constantly reinvent themselves, and create a more compelling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I taking care of my physical, emotional and spiritual health?”Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their leadership development programs.

Working with a seasoned cognitive executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help enlightened leaders create a sustainable future. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusmanis a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

© 2013 Dr. Maynard Brusman, Working Resources

 

Categories: 

Eleven Tips to Build Trust

I recently spoke with the senior VP of Human Resources of a Silicon Valley company regarding providing executive coaching for the company CEO. She asked some very insightful questions to determine fit. She specifically wanted to know how I work with different personality styles, and my methods for initiating change in thinking and behavior.

The senior VP of HR and I spoke about my approach to coaching, and my belief that possessing a psychological understanding of human behavior based on neuroscience and emotional intelligence are important competencies for coaching executives. We also spoke of the need for her company to create a high involvement culture where innovation and creativity flourish.

The senior VP of HR is interested in partnering with me in helping create a collaborative and high involvement corporate culture based on trust and respect. We further discussed how company executives can benefit by working with a seasoned cognitive executive coach.

“Trusting relationships are what make the difference between people’s feeling good about what they do and simply going through the motions. Trust is inspiring and energy producing.”
~ Dennis and Michelle Reina, Trust & Betrayal in the Workplace

Organizations are woefully slow to realize the bottom-line implications of trust deficits. Despite trust’s importance, few leaders give it the focus it deserves. Misunderstood as a nebulous “feeling,” trust is earned through consistent, positive behaviors practiced over time, making it ultimately manageable.

 “Trust always affects two outcomes—speed and cost,” confirms leadership guru Stephen M. Covey in The Speed of Trust. “When trust goes down, speed will also go down and costs will go up. When trust goes up, speed will also go up and costs will go down. It’s that simple, that real, that predictable.”

Trust is one of the essential ingredients to build a great relationship, winning team and a high involvement culture. Without trust you can’t have engaged relationships and without engaged relationships you won’t be a successful leader, manager, sales person, team member, coach, etc.

You can build the trust that is essential for great relationships. The following are eleven ideas to build trust . Feel free to share these simple reminders with your leaders, colleagues and team.

Mindful leaders implement the following tips to build trust:

1. Display character: What do your employees see when they look at you? How do they perceive your values, work ethic, integrity and honesty? Studies consistently cite honesty as managers’ No. 1 attribute—consistently doing what they say they’ll do. When managers act with integrity and reliability, they lay a foundation on which employees can rely.
2. Model competence: Employees place more trust in you when they believe you’re capable of effective leadership. This does not mean you’re the smartest one in the room—a position of superiority that, in fact, undermines perceived competency. Your managerial competency should not be measured by your technical skills, but by your ability to understand and influence people.
3. Show you care: The most neglected ingredient in the trust trinity is the ability to show you care. Employees don’t want to be cogs in a wheel. They want to feel that they matter and their bosses actually care about them as people. Only then can they reciprocate with trust.
4. Open up: During the course of your workday, squeeze in an occasional impromptu conversation with a subordinate about interests other than work, such as children’s activities, restaurants, sports, movies and the like. Share a glimpse into your personal life while taking time to listen.
5. Empathize: Offer brief, personal acknowledgments of significant events in employees’ lives, such as additions to family, marriage, family death and serious illness. Share how a similar event impacted your life without overshadowing the employee’s circumstance.
6.Remain professional: Share information that enhances the work relationship, yet doesn’t harm your reputation. Exercise discretion; avoid over sharing.
7. Go on a walkabout: Walk around the office each day to touch base with individual contributors to your company’s success. While email and group meetings are important, one-on-one “face time” is critical.
8.Capture vital statistics: Learn about each employee’s life: spouse’s name, children’s names and ages, major hobbies. Use questions to elicit meaningful information: “Where are you from?” or “What do you do on your days off?”
9. Find similarities: Instead of focusing on differences, find mutual interests (hobbies, desires, career goals).
10. Ask for ideas and feedback: Trust must already be established for people to be honest with you. Ask what they need to perform their jobs better. Acknowledge that you hear their opinions and will think about what they’ve said. Don’t dismiss or argue the merits of their input; offer a simple and genuine “thanks for sharing that.” 
11. Acknowledge progress and milestones: In many organizations, problems are solved, barriers are surmounted, tasks are completed… and nothing is noted. People crave acknowledgment and recognition, so seize these opportunities to build trust. Celebrate progress. Don’t let it slip by unnoticed.

"We can let the circumstances of our lives harden us so that we become increasingly resentful and afraid, or we can let them soften us, and make us kinder. We always have a choice." -- The Dalai Lama  

Are you working in a professional services firm or other organization where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to build relationships built on trust? Resonant leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Do I have emotional intelligence competence to reinvent myself and grow?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their transformational peak performance leadership development program.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help you become a more trustworthy leader. You can become a leader who models emotional and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 
Connect with me on these Social Media sites.

http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

© 2013 Dr. Maynard Brusman, Working Resources

 

Categories: 

Principle or Cognition; What's your preference?

Like many I have been following with interest the current fiasco that has brought the U.S. Senate to a standstill. Regardless of your political preferences there are some interesting dynamics at play that have reminded me of the importance of being an agile leader. You see there are two predominant leadership approaches which leader employ:

Lead by Principle: Making decisions and taking actions that are built from and support foundational beliefs.

Lead by Cognition: Processing information, applying knowledge and changing behaviors and preferences based on shifting environmental factors and information.

One approach is very stable, while the other is very nimble and flexible. A successful leader propels from one approach to the other depending on the circumstance presented to them.

I recall working with a Vice President several years ago who consistently applied the lead by cognition style, changing his mind continuously. Of course there were some benefits to this behavior, but unfortunately the longer employees were exposed to his style, the more disembodied they became from the organizations vision, mission and overall direction. I spent some time working with this Vice President helping him to gain clarity on the specific principles the organization and he himself worked under, allowing for the injection of building blocks or principles if you will upon which cognition could be applied.

So my question for you is this. Are you an agile leader? Are your decisions and feedback built upon principles yet made in cognition? If the US Senate was able to make this collective shift I believe we would have less of a disagreement and greater overall momentum.

Categories: 

How To Keep Your CMO Out Of The CEO Shark Tank

3015073-poster-p-1-how-to-keep-your-cmo-out-of-the-ceo-shark-tank
In my previous post, I outlined the biggest barriers that keep marketing leaders in the C-suite shark tank, and prevent them from building their boardroom gravitas. How can you overcome these barriers quickly and effectively? Here’s what my best clients do:

1. Parse your CEO-influencing strategy into smaller steps. The purpose of communicating a compelling message in the CEO’s language is to generate interest; interest generates a meeting; meetings create trusting relationships; and relationships drive conceptual agreement. You need a conceptual agreement to define objectives, measures of success, and value to the organization, customers, employees, shareholders, and community. The conceptual agreement fuels the business case and facilitates the approval cycle.

2. Align your executive meeting reports, reporting cadence, and language with your Sales and Finance peers. Report on your annual and quarterly progress against key metrics first. Ensure you report on demand creation activities in the early portion of meetings. Downplay highlights on tactical issues, such as a logo design, Twitter campaigns, or live customer events. They can be reported on a “need to know” basis or email summary.

3. Avoid a “one size fits all” report across all product lines. Ensure the marketing KPIs you select align with the life cycle of each product in your portfolio. Let’s face it: Not all marketing initiatives are capital investments. They may be expenses attributed to your company’s P&L, not the balance sheet. This is especially true when you are developing a brand-new product or creating a new market. When you are 18-36 months away from launch, building your early marquis customer list, signing up name brand partners, and generating PR traction will be more critical than tracking contribution margin or revenue against plan. Those early market programs are essential to fuel your growth engine and diversify your product portfolio.

At Digi International, executive chairman Joe Dunsmore recognizes that the KPIs needed for tracking performance within their newer Etherios business unit are dramatically different from their traditional offerings.

Dunsmore stresses that one way to increase market penetration for their well-established wireless radio frequency products is by consistently delivering compelling content at gallery.digi.com: “On this site, Digi creates content that is exclusively designed to celebrate customers’ innovations. Instead of focusing on our product features, we create a sense of community around the brand.”

4. Ask the CEO what she wants to see on the reports. Create a custom report that reflects her biggest priorities as well as your progress against your top three performance goals. Set your ego aside and put her KPIs at the top of the report.

5. Stay agile. Sometimes the numbers will not tell the entire story. Dramatic market shifts, new competitors, and team attrition may drive the need for a CEO-CMO huddle.

6. Tell the bad news first. Transparency drives trust. Former Eloqua CEO Joe Payne reminds us that “If I know that you know, then I can trust you will solve the problem. Tell me the bad news immediately, and show me a way you are going to fix it. If you don’t talk about your plan and your progress, then you are in a bad place. And I will assume you don’t even know you are in a bad place. That’s when I need to find someone else to fill your shoes.”

Once your CEO recognizes that you care about the pipeline and can speak her language, you will earn respect. In the long term, you will also escape the clutches of the man-eating sea creatures lurking in the boardroom.

Related Posts:


Why Today's Marketing Planning Models Fail To Deliver In The C-Suite

Why CMOs Also Have To Be Thought Leaders

6 Questions All CMOs Need To Ask Themselves

[Image: Flickr user Ross Garner]

 

Copyright 2013, Lisa Nirell. All rights reserved.

This post originally appeared in FastCompany.

Categories: 

The Power of Habit - How to Change Them

The Power of Habit

Mindful leaders know that serving others is the key to better business results, greater team involvement, happier followers and a sustainable future.

Act Mindfully

Many of the leaders I see in my emotional intelligence-based executive coaching practice of over twenty-five years are working long hours and are stressed-out.Some of my clients complain of low energy and exhaustion. They frequently are sleep deprived. Getting adequate sleep is an enormous help in restoring mental clarity and the drive to succeed.

My holistic approach to coaching is to work with the whole person, so upon request I weave into my leadership development work the importance of stress resiliency, mindfulness, daily meditation practice, exercise and proper nutrition. I recommend clients see their physician if they have specific health concerns, and make referrals to nutritionists, fitness trainers and other health experts when appropriate.

Act mindfully and savor your relationships at work and at home. Stop doing things that no longer serve you. Create the powerful habit of “pacing” yourself to restore energy, build resiliency and create well-being.

"Respect yourself and others will respect you."– Confucius

Identify Patterns

Watch this hilarious video:

Bob Newhart-Stop Ithttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ow0lr63y4Mw

In his thought provoking book “The Power of Habit”, Charles Duhigg, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, tackles an important reality head on. That is, people succeed when they identify patterns that shape their lives--and learn how to change them. This idea--that you can indeed change your habits--draws on recent research in experimental psychology, neurology, and applied psychology.

Duhigg looks at the habits of individuals, how habits operate in the brain, howcompanies use them, and how retailers use habits to manipulate buying habits. The author's main contention is that "you have the freedom and responsibility" to remake your habits. He says "the most addicted alcoholics can become sober. The most dysfunctional companies can transform themselves. A high school dropout can become a successful manager."

"The Habit Loop" explains exactly what a habit is.According to the author, habits make up 40% of our daily routine. The process within our brains is a three-step loop.  First, there is a cue, a trigger that tells your brain to go into automatic mode and which behavior to use. Second, there is the routine, which can be physical or mental or emotional. Finally, there is the reward.

Your daily habits create the foundation of your life–your health, wealth, happiness, productivity, quality of relationships, and energy level. You can become more mindful creating the intention to interrupt patterns that don’t serve you. Establish positive habits that lead to a happy and prosperous life.

Neuroscience research

You create habits as an efficiency mechanism. Neuroscience research tells us that the brain quickly transforms as many tasks and behaviors as possible into habits so that we can do them without thinking. This frees up the brain to deal with new challenges. But first, we have to integrate the new habit and that can feel challenging.

Think about when you start a new activity. Your brain works hard to integrate it into your life, processing huge amounts of new information as you progress through the activity. As soon as you understand how it works, your behavior starts becoming automatic and the amount of mental effort required to perform the activity decreases.

Positive new habits

The best way to approach creating positive new habits that will last is to take baby steps bringing them into your life one at a time. This gives you the opportunity to repeat the habit over and over until it is a part of your automatic behavior, and also allows you to focus the extra brainpower required for the habit on one or few activities so you aren’t overwhelmed. Then when your habit is automatic, you can add another one.

It might seem counter-intuitive, and that this approach will bring slow results. But, when you consider that studies show most people only make changes for a short amount of time before giving up, this approach actually brings results fast. Plus, you can say goodbye to that discouraging yo-yo cycle of starting and then breaking habits! Dieting is a good example of an intention that often goes awry, and demotivates people.

Keystone Habits

Watch this video! http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4H0fTwtPLfo

It wasn’t the trip to Cairo that had caused the shift, scientists were convinced, or the divorce or desert trek. It was that Lisa had focused on changing just one habit—smoking—at first. Everyone in the study had gone through a similar process. By focusing on one pattern—what is known as a “keystone habit”—Lisa had taught herself how to reprogram the other routines in her life, as well.”
~ Charles Duhigg in “The Power of Habit”

This is my favorite Big Idea in the book. The basic idea: There’s a habit that when we change it will have the greatest positive impact on our lives. It’s a KEYSTONE habit. Keystones are good.

As the Apple dictionary tells us, a keystone is “a central stone at the summit of an arch, locking the whole together.”

So...what’s your keystone habit? What’s the #1 thing you could change that would have the most positive impact on your life? Is it quitting smoking? No longer drinking? Drastically reducing your internet time? Getting your inbox to zero? Meditating every day? Think about it. And pick one.

Exercise

This is a keystone habit for me that I commit to changing: Frequency of checking e-mail

So, let’s look at my Cue + Routine + Reward.

Old pattern: Cue = Checking my e-mail first thing in the morning. Routine = Tell myself there might be something important that needs my immediate attention. Reward = Convinced myself that there are no problems lurking out there for me.

New pattern: Cue = Getting out of bed bright and early ready to get a fast start to my day. Routine = Tell myself how much more productive I will be getting some “real work” (writing a blog post or article etc.) before checking my e-mail. Reward = Honored my commitment to be more focused, strategic and productive. Stopped fooling myself that checking e-mail incessantly is helping me reach my goals for the day!

Back to you: What’s your keystone habit? And your Cue + Routine + Reward?

The book goes into more detail that will be very helpful for you as you look to re-shape your habits, but let’s take a quick inventory:

My keystone habit:_____________________________________

My current Cue:_______________________________________

My current Routine:____________________________________

My current Reward:____________________________________

My new Cue: _________________________________________

My new Routine:_______________________________________

My new Reward:_______________________________________

Well done! Practice your new habit for thirty days so that it is well established. Change your brain and thrive!

 

Healthy Eating Habits

"We don't stop playing games because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing games." ­
-- George Bernard Shaw

What high performance leaders eat is so important to their success. A number of my clients seeking better nutrition have found reading the books “Eat to Live” by Joel Fuhrman, MD, and "The Perfect Health Diet” by Paul Jaminet and Shou-Ching Shih Jaminet, and changing their eating habits very helpful to restore energy and vitality.

Jack Lallane, the fitness guru recommended mostly eating “live food”. Processed or man-made food may not have helped him in his 90’s pull all of those boats in the water!

  

“Real Age" Health Survey

I recently took the "Real Age" Health Survey and found it a pretty good indicator of my health habits, which is vitally important as we get older and hopefully healthier and wiser.
I'm really 58 not 66. My goal is to be 24. I can dream big and so can you!

A number of my executive coaching clients have found taking the health survey a real wake-up call! You can take the free survey at http://www.doctoroz.com/realage

Sustainable leaders take time for self-reflection, model healthy behaviors and flourish. They seek constant reinvention.  A bit of luck can help too! Are your health habits serving you?

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to grow emotionally intelligent leaders? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders? Sustainable leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to constantly reinvent themselves, and create a more compelling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I taking care of my physical, emotional and spiritual health and ending bad habits?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching as part of their leadership development programs.

Working with a seasoned cognitive executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help enlightened leaders create a sustainable future. You can become a leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage  and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach
Trusted Advisor to Senior Leadership Teams

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

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