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The Business Case for Positivity

Creating a Positive or Growth Mindset

I’ve learned over the years that my most effective executive coaching leadership clients know the “why” of what they are passionate in achieving. They get excited in my office telling me inspiring stories of their hopes and struggles. They have a growth versus fixed mindset, and are optimistic and forward thinking.

One of my executive coaching clients confided in me this week that he was struggling to convince several of their senior executives on changing their company culture.  The data from a recent company engagement survey indicated that far too many employees were not engaged wit the mission and vision of the company. It was as if the big egos in the room were locked in a battle of who was right and blaming the others for perceived failures.

I asked him “What happens or behaviors do you observe now and what would you like to see in the future?” He responded, “I tolerate behaviors that don’t contribute to growth”.  I suggested that he first work on becoming aware of his own habits and patterns of behavior.  He then would model the new desired behavior.

At our next meeting, he reported that it interrupted the pattern of a battle of wits and got everyone’s attention. The members of the executive team thought that if he was so passionate about his belief in creating a new culture that they began to pay attention to their own habits and patterns of behavior that were counterproductive to creating a high performance culture.

Emotionally intelligent leaders know that creating a positive workplace culture and climate where emotions are appropriately expressed increases engagement and moves things forward.  In order for people to be fully engaged, they need to feel they are following leaders who inspire them emotionally.

The Business Case for Positivity

As scientists study the brain and learn more about how we achieve optimal functioning, the term positivity has finally captured business leaders’ interests. What researchers are discovering about positive emotions at work is essential knowledge for anyone who wants to lead individuals and organizations to high performance.

One study of CEOs showed that positivity training could boost their productivity by 15 percent, and managers improved customer satisfaction by 42 percent. Positivity training programs have demonstrated excellent results with tax auditors, investment bankers and lawyers.

Briefly, here’s what these groups are taught to reduce stress and raise their levels of happiness and success:

  1. How to develop a positive mindset
  2. How to build their social support networks
  3. How to buffer themselves against negativity

Despite such training’s amazing results, many leaders remain completely unfamiliar with the concept.  Maybe there’s a stigma attached to positive thinking and happiness.

Being positive isn’t simply about being nice and giving in, nor does it mean suppressing negative information and emotions.  Both are critical for optimal performance. Apparently, however, a 3:1 positivity-to-negativity ratio is the tipping point for individuals and business teams to go from average to flourishing.

When you experience and express three times as much positive as negative emotion, you pave the way for excellence and high performance. Most of us (80 percent) experience a ratio of 2:1.

In business, positive emotions yield:

1.  Better decisions. Researchers at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business studied how positive moods affect managers. Managers with greater positivity were more accurate and careful in making decisions, and were more effective interpersonally.

2.  Better team work. Managers with positive emotions infect their work groups with similar feelings and show improved team coordination, while reporting less effort to accomplish more.

3.  Better negotiating. At Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, researchers learned that when people negotiate complex bargains, positivity again surfaces as a contributing factor for success.

Negotiators who strategically display positivity are more likely to gain concessions, close deals and incorporate future business relationships into the contracts they seal. Those who come to the bargaining table with a cooperative and friendly spirit strike the best business deals.

Positive emotions directly correlate with:

·   Increased creativity

·   More curiosity and interest in the world

·   Better health

·   Better social relationships

·   Optimism and perseverance

·   Longevity

The business benefits of positivity include:

·   Lower turnover

·   Improved customer service

·   Better supervisor evaluations

·   Lower emotional fatigue

·   Higher job satisfaction

·   Better organizational citizenship (ethics)

·   Fewer work absences

·   Improved innovation

·   Better safety records

Emotions’ Role in Business

For businesses and organizations, emotions are functional.  Both negative and positive emotions work to drive results. Negative emotions serve to limit our thoughts and behaviors, helping us to act more decisively in times of stress or crisis.

Positivity broadens your outlook, opens you to new solutions and ideas, and brings more possibilities into view. Positivity fosters vital human moments that go beyond optimism and a smiling face. It infuses your mindset and outlook, affects your heart rhythms and body chemistry, reduces muscle tension and improves relationships.

The Broaden-and-Build Model of Positive Emotions

Unlike negative emotions, which narrow our focus with respect to possible actions, positive emotions achieve the opposite: They open us. Positivity expands our social, physical and cognitive resources.

Psychologist Barbara Fredrickson, PhD, has conducted extensive research in this area. She outlines her “broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions” in Positivity: Groundbreaking Research Reveals How to Embrace the Hidden Strength of Positive Emotions, Overcome Negativity and Thrive (Crown Archetype, 2009).

Dr. Fredrickson suggests that positive emotions (enjoyment, happiness, joy, interest and anticipation) broaden our awareness and encourage novel, varied, and exploratory thoughts and actions. Over time, this expanded behavioral repertoire helps us build skills and resources.

In contrast, negative emotions prompt narrow, immediate, survival-oriented behaviors. For example, anxiety sparks a primal fight-or-flight response, which we needed to survive during our caveman days. When anxious, we narrow our focus to shut out distractions—important for cavemen, but often counterproductive in business.

On the other hand, positive emotions take your mind off stressors. Over time, the skills and resources you have built through broadened awareness serve to enhance your professional survival. (They are essential for innovation, customer service and employee engagement.)

Dr. Fredrickson conducted studies in which participants watched films that induced either positive (amusement, contentment), negative (fear, sadness) or no emotions. Viewers who experienced positive emotions showed heightened levels of creativity, inventiveness and “big picture” perceptual focus.

Dr. Fredrickson emphasizes two core truths about positive emotions:

1.  They open our hearts and minds, making us more receptive and creative.

2.  Consequently, we can discover and build new skills, ties, knowledge and ways of being.

Positivity and High Performance

For years, organizational psychologist Marcial Losada, PhD, studied the characteristics of high-performing business teams.As part of his work, he designed a meeting room to capture the real-time behavior of business teams in action.

The room resembled any ordinary boardroom, but it was fitted with one-way mirrors and video cameras that allowed research assistants to record every statement during company teams’ hour-long meetings.

In particular, Dr. Losada tracked whether individuals’ statements were:

1.  Positive or negative

2.  Self- or other-focused

3.  Based on inquiry (asking questions) or advocacy (defending a point of view)

By the mid-’90s, 60 different teams had been observed and coded. At the same time, each team’s performance level was identified based on independent data. Twenty-five percent met the criteria for high performance based on three distinct indicators:

1.  Profitability

2.  Customer satisfaction ratings

3.  Evaluations by superiors, peers and subordinates

About 30 percent scored low on all three factors.The rest had mixed profiles. Dr. Losada also rated team behavior on connectivity (how well tuned or responsive members were to one another).

When he later divided the teams into high, low and mixed performance levels, striking differences emerged. High-performance teams stood out by their unusually high positivity-to-negativity ratios: about 6:1. Mixed-performance teams scored ratios of 2:1, while low-performing teams scored 1:1.

High-performing teams also had higher connectivity ratings and an interesting balance on other dimensions. Members asked questions as much as they defended their own views, and they cast their attention outward as much as inward.

Low-performing teams, however, had far lower connectivity, asked almost no questions and showed almost no outward focus.

The positivity/negativity ratio has been found to be a critical parameter in ascertaining what kinds of dynamics are possible for business teams. It is measured by counting the instances of positive feedback (e.g., “that is a good idea”) vs. negative feedback (e.g., “this is not what I expected; I am disappointed”).

Dr. Losada’s findings can be summarized as follows: If a team is highly connected, its members will tend to maintain an equilibrium between internal and external focus, as well as between inquiry and advocacy. They will also maintain a positivity/negativity ratio above 3:1.

If connectivity is low, the team will be more internally focused, it will advocate strongly, and its positivity/negativity ratio will be below 3:1.

The Tipping Point: 3:1 Positivity Ratio

Dr. Losada’s research correlates with Dr. Fredrickson’s, in that both independently arrived at a 3:1 positivity-to-negativity ratio for optimal functioning (whether for individuals or teams).

Psychologist John Gottman, PhD, an expert on marital relationships, found similar data for successful marriages. In flourishing marriages, positivity ratios were about 5:1. Similarly, research by clinical psychologist Robert Schwartz, PhD, cites an optimal positivity ratio of 4:1.

Most people (more than 80 percent), when reporting their experiences over the course of a day, report about a 2:1 positivity/negativity ratio.

For a small percentage, however, the ratio will be over 3:1. This correlates with high performance, life satisfaction and other measures of flourishing.

Improve Your Ratio

You can take a self-evaluation of your positivity/negativity ratio at Dr. Fredrickson’s site, www.positivityratio.com. To improve your ratio, you must decrease the number and intensity of negative moments, increase the positive moments, or both.

The goal is not to eliminate bad thoughts. Negative emotions are appropriate and useful. Properly used, negativity keeps us grounded, real and honest. It provides energy at crucial moments.

We need to become aware, however, of gratuitous negativity. For example, if you work with someone who’s annoying, you probably plug into negativity with each encounter.This is an entrenched emotional habit—and while it may be justified, it’s detrimental to your success and well-being.

Fortunately, simple awareness of negativity has a curative effect. Once you learn to spot it, you can defuse it. This is similar to the practice of mindfulness meditation, where you observe your thoughts without judgment.

To reduce negative thinking, adopt these useful techniques from the field of cognitive behavioral psychology and Dr. Fredrickson’s book:

  1. Dispute negative, black-and-white thinking habits (always/never, most/least, internal/external).
  2. Break ruminative thinking (use distractions to change mood).
  3. Become more mindful (observe without judgment).
  4. Reduce bad news streams.
  5. Avoid gossip and sarcasm.
  6. Smile more often at people.

Raise Your Positivity

Scientists are experimenting to discover new ways to boost positivity.  Because of the brain’s neuroplasticity, we can rewire it to create new thought habits and become more positive.

Like any new activity, this requires practice. It may take a while for positive thinking to become natural and habitual. Try these three frequently cited exercises to create positive thinking habits:

1. Practice gratitude.Keep a daily gratitude list. Ask yourself questions like “What went right?” and “What was the best part of today?”

2. Practice positive feedback. Catch people doing things right. As you practice this skill and express your appreciation more often, people will shine. You’ll also become more aware of what works.

3.  Envision your best possible future. When you daydream about your future, you set yourself up for goal-directed behaviors. Having a vision for the future is reassuring when the going gets tough. Envisioning your best possible future helps you persevere and provides hope and energy.

Unfortunately, few leaders pay attention to positivity in the workplace. Positivity training programs don’t seem serious enough for business allocations, and some leaders may think they’re already pretty positive.

Indeed, most people score about a 2:1 positivity/negativity ratio. While it’s rare to find people who enjoy a 3:1 ratio, remember that it’s the true tipping point between average and flourishing.

You can develop a more positive mindset by working with a professional coach. The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put positive leadership into action? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more positive? Positive leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a positive leader who helps individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture positivity in the workplace. You can become a more positive leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

Categories: 

Good Leaders Are Hard To Find

Do you have strong leaders in your business today? If so, do they have the attitude, beliefs and character to continue to evolve and develop as the needs of the business and it's customers change? I call these the "A - B - C's" of leadership.

The reality is that for most companies there is always a need for a rejuvenation and realignment of leadership as the company evolves. If you're unsure of whether you require a shift in leadership, here's a test for you. If I suggested to you that we could wave a magic wand and replace any of the executives, managers, or supervisors in your company, are there names that immediately come to mind? If "yes," my question to you would be, what are you waiting for

 

Having a less than adequate leadership is a barrier to business success, no matter how you slice it. Investing in improvements to employees, processes, or technology without strong, strategic and supportive leadership is like having a new Ferrari fueled up and ready to go, but you don't have the key.

 

If you want to identify or select strong leaders, here are the criteria that I use when performing leadership assessments for my clients that you can use to measure the potential and effectiveness of your leaders, confirming whether or not they are the "right fit" for your future:

 

Senior leaders

  • Vision focused - they support and can articulate to employees the desired future state of the organization.
  • Positive mindset - they are not negative or bitchy; they remain optimistic in the face of challenge.
  • Genuine and motivating - they are respectful of employee needs while remaining true to business objectives.

Middle Management

  • Strategic mindset - they can function tactically, but also connect with the strategic vision of the organization.
  • Connectors and collaborators - they are able to create collaborative connections across business units.
  • Dirty hands - they are not afraid to get their hands dirty and experience "a day in the life" of their employees.

Front line leaders

  • Delegate over doing - they are adept at managing workload through delegation and employee empowerment.
  • Patient and pragmatic - they balance efforts to build, support and nurture employee relationships.
  • Dedicated and deliberate - their intentions are clear and they show an unrivaled devotion to the company.

 

Question: How do your leaders measure up to these charateristics? If you realize that there are gaps, how and when will you address these gaps?


Categories: 

Emotional Intelligence Solutions for Toxic Leadership

We coach leaders to cultivate creativity, clarity, focus and trust in a full engagement culture.

Toxic Leadership

“Toxic leaders cast their spell broadly. Most of us claim we abhor them. Yet we frequently follow — or at least tolerate — them.” ~ Jean Lipman-Blumen, The Allure of Toxic Leaders(Oxford University Press, 2004)

Much has been written about toxic leaders with psychopathic traits and narcissistic personality disorders. Bad leaders leave a trail of diminishing returns, ruined reputations, failed products, employee litigation and disheartened staffs.

But applying labels doesn’t solve any problems. Leadership is relationship-driven, and organizational toxicity involves all levels—from followers to executive boards. Chopping off the rotting head won’t do the trick when the entire organizational system has been infected.

Companies that replace one dysfunctional leader with another often run through a series of CEOs in an attempt to find the right savior. They’re effectively changing seats on the Titanic. Consultants and coaches may try to treat toxicity’s symptoms, but they’ll achieve lasting results only when they address its root causes.

Despite our best efforts at developing leadership skills, we continue to witness counterproductive and destructive workplace behaviors. Toxic leadership is a major contributor to employee disengagement.

In Search of Answers

“Toxicity is everybody’s business, just as ‘quality is everybody’s business’ in TQM.” ~ Alan Goldman, Transforming Toxic Leaders(Stanford University Press, 2009)

There’s no shortage of bestselling business books that pose the following questions:

·   How do we handle high achievers with difficult behaviors that push the limits?

·  Why do followers and executive boards tolerate and empower toxic leaders?

·  Why are HR experts, boards, managers and others so reluctant to respond to toxic behaviors?

·   Should we fire a dysfunctional CEO or hire a leadership coach who provides detoxification training?

The dark side of leadership emerges over time. Left unchecked, bad behavior invites turnover, absenteeism, grievances, bad press and costly lawsuits.

Can leadership coaches and consultants diagnose and “cure” these destructive leaders?

It’s not easy. Most toxic leadership behaviors are embedded in dysfunctional systems that actually promote destructiveness through poor policies, avoidance and negligence.

Signs of Toxicity

Toxic leaders have been responsible for numerous horrific business failures in the last few decades: Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling at Enron, Dennis Kozlowski at Tyco International and Bernard Ebbers of WorldCom. While many organizations have toxic leaders, they may manage to survive for years before problems get out of hand.

There is no precise definition of toxic behavior. Most people recognize it as displays of arrogance, selfishness, manipulation, bullying, callousness and control. Toxic bosses may be smooth and polished with people they need, but disrespectful and harsh with subordinates.

Many toxic bosses achieve spectacular results and wind up in the limelight, so their transgressions are forgiven or tolerated. They use their ability to manipulate people to further their own careers, no matter the cost to the organization or its people.

In the short term, they act like heroes and create loyal followers who produce great results. In the long term, they create enemies, bend rules, and push the limits of ethics and relationships.

When business results are positive, toxic behaviors may go unchecked. But when the bottom line takes a dip, CEOs lose their patience — but it’s often much more difficult to make corrections at that point.

Resisting External Help

Coaches and consultants know firsthand that corporate toxicity rarely has a single cause, leader or culprit. Attempts to single out destructive leaders won’t fix all problems. Multiple levels of the organization should be scrutinized.

CEOs must be willing to take a participatory approach to healing at all levels. Otherwise, they risk hiring and promoting more toxic leaders in the future. Unfortunately, companies often call in external experts only after reluctantly acknowledging the scope of their problems.

Even when they do ask for help, many CEOS have already chosen a culprit, and they try to dictate their agenda to the outside consultant. When entrenched in defensive and protective behaviors, leaders often resist attempts to change established patterns of negative organizational behavior.

Experienced coaches and consultants anticipate and push through this resistance. They are usually adept at evaluating toxic dynamics and preparing an honest, accurate evaluation.

Even the most highly productive leaders have some toxic qualities that contribute to their success. The earlier an organization retains external experts, the easier it will be to resolve unhealthy dynamics.

Transformation Opportunities

Perhaps what’s needed is a counterintuitive approach. Instead of dwelling on toxic behaviors’ destructive impact, consultants and coaches can work with leaders to identify opportunities inherent in their deficits.

Is this unrealistic? One expert doesn’t think so.

Instead of viewing toxic leaders as villains and liabilities, think of them as potential assets, innovators and rebels, urges management professor Alan Goldman in Transforming Toxic Leaders.

Working on the premise that “toxicity is a fact of company life,” Goldman suggests there are advantages to be gained from skillful anticipation, control, and handling of troubled and difficult leaders.

Dysfunctional organizations will ignore toxicity and its impact. Conversely, successful companies come up with resourceful, innovative strategies for turning seeming deficits into developmental opportunities.

Toxicity Prevention Plan

Goldman offers 10 steps to preparing for toxicity’s impact on the workplace:

1. Take a proactive, preventive approach to detecting and handling dysfunctional behaviors. Articulate strategies for identifying problems throughout the company.

2. Find innovative ways to solve identified toxicity problems.

3.  Engage external consultants and coaches as helping partners, when necessary.

4.  Provide leadership and employees with emotional-intelligence training, which will improve relationships and toxin detection/management skills.

5. Provide negotiation and conflict-resolution training for management and HR leaders.

6.  Develop organizational protocols for preventing, assessing and treating toxic behaviors. (Hiring an outside management consultant may be warranted.)

7. Designate managers or HR leaders to function as toxin detectors and handlers. Companywide training in toxicity and counterproductive behavior is appropriate.

8.  Review your organization’s and leaders’ orientation toward workplace problems. How do you handle personnel and relationship conflicts? Toxin detection?

9.  Review your current grievance, mediation, arbitration and/or ombudsperson policies to determine compatibility with, and support of, other toxin-related initiatives.

10.  Use 360-degree feedback for early detection of interpersonal problems and dysfunctional behaviors.

Readiness for Change

Trauma often opens doors. Sometimes a situation has to deteriorate before people shout “Enough!” By the time HR, the executive board, the senior team and employees start using the “toxic” label, conflicts likely abound.

If top leaders or managers disagree about solutions, organizations may postpone making important decisions and allow toxic behavior to continue. When the people at the top engage in power struggles, the consequences reverberate throughout the company: profit dips, layoffs, increased absenteeism and turnover, poor performance and abysmal customer service.

But fear and urgency are often good motivators, prompting leaders to face facts and do something. As Goldman notes, “Any transformation begins with a change in thinking and vocabulary.”

When coaches or consultants interview personnel about what’s wrong, they’ll listen for roadblocks and obstacles to readiness. They want to determine:

·  Where are the openings for change?

·  In which areas can there be a shift from negative to positive?

·  In spite of everything that’s wrong, where are the successes?

The coach or consultant will identify potential areas for success, shifting everyone’s language and thinking from deficits to opportunities.

Toxicity Correction Plan

Is it ever too late for a prevention plan? Is transformation truly possible in the face of pervasive toxicity?

Many case studies have proved that change is possible, but it requires a major shift in assumptions and engagement in coaching/training.

Start with the following steps for lowering your organization’s toxicity levels:

1. People must believe that change is possible and a realistic goal.

2. Everyone must accept personal accountability andabandon the use of labels and finger-pointing. Employees at all levels should identify their role in a given problem and find ways to help instead of hinder.

3. Everyone must agree to limit the use of negative language and focus instead on the organization’s overarching vision and goals. Consider training in positive leadership and the language of appreciation.

4. Key parties must attend coaching sessions to improve their interpersonal relationships, to process and eliminate toxic stories. Coaches can help them identify their strengths and develop coping skills that address their deficits.

5. Make training in emotional and social intelligence available throughout the organization.

6. Prioritize social and emotional intelligence in frequent performance reviews.

7. Consider recognizing small wins in project management to encourage appreciative communication.

8. Hire or designate toxin detectors and handlers who are trained in early detection of dysfunctional behaviors. Establish a program for early intervention.

9. Senior teams and executive boards should be charged with finding innovative solutions to their personal leadership deficits (i.e., appointing dual leaders for some positions, implementing collaborative leadership policies).

10.  Leaders should be encouraged to identify an expanded vision for the future—one that inspires people to work collaboratively.

While these correctional steps may seem idealistic, they’re not unrealistic. Of course, they require time and willingness. Recognizing toxicity as an opportunity for transformational change in organizations can be a turning point.

You can develop the qualities of positive leadership by working with a professional coach.The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put positive leadership into action?Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more tap into the intrinsic motivation of followers? Positive leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a positive leader who inspires individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture mindful conversations in the workplace. You can become an inspiring leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: 

Executive Coaching for Transforming Toxic Leadership

We coach leaders to cultivate creativity, clarity, focus and trust in a full engagement culture.

Toxic Leadership: A New Look at Solutions

“Toxic leaders cast their spell broadly. Most of us claim we abhor them. Yet we frequently follow — or at least tolerate — them.” ~ Jean Lipman-Blumen, The Allure of Toxic Leaders (Oxford University Press, 2004)

Much has been written about toxic leaders with psychopathic traits and narcissistic personality disorders. Bad leaders leave a trail of diminishing returns, ruined reputations, failed products, employee litigation and disheartened staffs.

But applying labels doesn’t solve any problems. Leadership is relationship-driven, and organizational toxicity involves all levels—from followers to executive boards. Chopping off the rotting head won’t do the trick when the entire organizational system has been infected.

Companies that replace one dysfunctional leader with another often run through a series of CEOs in an attempt to find the right savior. They’re effectively changing seats on the Titanic. Consultants and coaches may try to treat toxicity’s symptoms, but they’ll achieve lasting results only when they address its root causes.

Despite our best efforts at developing leadership skills, we continue to witness counterproductive and destructive workplace behaviors. Toxic leadership is a major contributor to employee disengagement.

In Search of Answers

“Toxicity is everybody’s business, just as ‘quality is everybody’s business’ in TQM.” ~ Alan Goldman, Transforming Toxic Leaders(Stanford University Press, 2009)

There’s no shortage of bestselling business books that pose the following questions:

·   How do we handle high achievers with difficult behaviors that push the limits?

·   Why do followers and executive boards tolerate and empower toxic leaders?

·   Why are HR experts, boards, managers and others so reluctant to respond to toxic behaviors?

·   Should we fire a dysfunctional CEO or hire a leadership coach who provides detoxification training?

The dark side of leadership emerges over time. Left unchecked, bad behavior invites turnover, absenteeism, grievances, bad press and costly lawsuits.

Can leadership coaches and consultants diagnose and “cure” these destructive leaders?

It’s not easy. Most toxic leadership behaviors are embedded in dysfunctional systems that actually promote destructiveness through poor policies, avoidance and negligence.

Signs of Toxicity

Toxic leaders have been responsible for numerous horrific business failures in the last few decades: Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling at Enron, Dennis Kozlowski at Tyco International and Bernard Ebbers of WorldCom. While many organizations have toxic leaders, they may manage to survive for years before problems get out of hand.

There is no precise definition of toxic behavior. Most people recognize it as displays of arrogance, selfishness, manipulation, bullying, callousness and control. Toxic bosses may be smooth and polished with people they need, but disrespectful and harsh with subordinates.

Many toxic bosses achieve spectacular results and wind up in the limelight, so their transgressions are forgiven or tolerated. They use their ability to manipulate people to further their own careers, no matter the cost to the organization or its people.

In the short term, they act like heroes and create loyal followers who produce great results. In the long term, they create enemies, bend rules, and push the limits of ethics and relationships.

When business results are positive, toxic behaviors may go unchecked. But when the bottom line takes a dip, CEOs lose their patience — but it’s often much more difficult to make corrections at that point.

Resisting External Help

Coaches and consultants know firsthand that corporate toxicity rarely has a single cause, leader or culprit. Attempts to single out destructive leaders won’t fix all problems. Multiple levels of the organization should be scrutinized.

CEOs must be willing to take a participatory approach to healing at all levels. Otherwise, they risk hiring and promoting more toxic leaders in the future. Unfortunately, companies often call in external experts only after reluctantly acknowledging the scope of their problems.

Even when they do ask for help, many CEOS have already chosen a culprit, and they try to dictate their agenda to the outside consultant. When entrenched in defensive and protective behaviors, leaders often resist attempts to change established patterns of negative organizational behavior.

Experienced coaches and consultants anticipate and push through this resistance. They are usually adept at evaluating toxic dynamics and preparing an honest, accurate evaluation.

Even the most highly productive leaders have some toxic qualities that contribute to their success. The earlier an organization retains external experts, the easier it will be to resolve unhealthy dynamics.

Transformation Opportunities

Perhaps what’s needed is a counterintuitive approach. Instead of dwelling on toxic behaviors’ destructive impact, consultants and coaches can work with leaders to identify opportunities inherent in their deficits.

Is this unrealistic? One expert doesn’t think so.

Instead of viewing toxic leaders as villains and liabilities, think of them as potential assets, innovators and rebels, urges management professor Alan Goldman in Transforming Toxic Leaders.

Working on the premise that “toxicity is a fact of company life,” Goldman suggests there are advantages to be gained from skillful anticipation, control, and handling of troubled and difficult leaders.

Dysfunctional organizations will ignore toxicity and its impact. Conversely, successful companies come up with resourceful, innovative strategies for turning seeming deficits into developmental opportunities.

Toxicity Prevention Plan

Goldman offers 10 steps to preparing for toxicity’s impact on the workplace:

1.  Take a proactive, preventive approach to detecting and handling dysfunctional behaviors. Articulate strategies for identifying problems throughout the company.

2.  Find innovative ways to solve identified toxicity problems.

3.  Engage external consultants and coaches as helping partners, when necessary.

4.  Provide leadership and employees with emotional-intelligence training, which will improve relationships and toxin detection/management skills.

5.  Provide negotiation and conflict-resolution training for management and HR leaders.

6.  Develop organizational protocols for preventing, assessing and treating toxic behaviors. (Hiring an outside management consultant may be warranted.)

7.  Designate managers or HR leaders to function as toxin detectors and handlers. Companywide training in toxicity and counterproductive behavior is appropriate.

8.  Review your organization’s and leaders’ orientation toward workplace problems. How do you handle personnel and relationship conflicts? Toxin detection?

9.  Review your current grievance, mediation, arbitration and/or ombudsperson policies to determine compatibility with, and support of, other toxin-related initiatives.

10. Use 360-degree feedback for early detection of interpersonal problems and dysfunctional behaviors.

Readiness for Change

Trauma often opens doors. Sometimes a situation has to deteriorate before people shout “Enough!” By the time HR, the executive board, the senior team and employees start using the “toxic” label, conflicts likely abound.

If top leaders or managers disagree about solutions, organizations may postpone making important decisions and allow toxic behavior to continue. When the people at the top engage in power struggles, the consequences reverberate throughout the company: profit dips, layoffs, increased absenteeism and turnover, poor performance and abysmal customer service.

But fear and urgency are often good motivators, prompting leaders to face facts and do something. As Goldman notes, “Any transformation begins with a change in thinking and vocabulary.”

When coaches or consultants interview personnel about what’s wrong, they’ll listen for roadblocks and obstacles to readiness. They want to determine:

·   Where are the openings for change?

·   In which areas can there be a shift from negative to positive?

·   In spite of everything that’s wrong, where are the successes?

The coach or consultant will identify potential areas for success, shifting everyone’s language and thinking from deficits to opportunities.

Toxicity Correction Plan

Is it ever too late for a prevention plan? Is transformation truly possible in the face of pervasive toxicity?

Many case studies have proved that change is possible, but it requires a major shift in assumptions and engagement in coaching/training.

Start with the following steps for lowering your organization’s toxicity levels:

1.  People must believe that change is possible and a realistic goal.

2.  Everyone must accept personal accountability andabandon the use of labels and finger-pointing. Employees at all levels should identify their role in a given problem and find ways to help instead of hinder.

3.  Everyone must agree to limit the use of negative language and focus instead on the organization’s overarching vision and goals. Consider training in positive leadership and the language of appreciation.

4.  Key parties must attend coaching sessions to improve their interpersonal relationships, to process and eliminate toxic stories. Coaches can help them identify their strengths and develop coping skills that address their deficits.

5.  Make training in emotional and social intelligence available throughout the organization.

6.  Prioritize social and emotional intelligence in frequent performance reviews.

7.  Consider recognizing small wins in project management to encourage appreciative communication.

8.  Hire or designate toxin detectors and handlers who are trained in early detection of dysfunctional behaviors. Establish a program for early intervention.

9.  Senior teams and executive boards should be charged with finding innovative solutions to their personal leadership deficits (i.e., appointing dual leaders for some positions, implementing collaborative leadership policies).

10.  Leaders should be encouraged to identify an expanded vision for the future—one that inspires people to work collaboratively.

While these correctional steps may seem idealistic, they’re not unrealistic. Of course, they require time and willingness. Recognizing toxicity as an opportunity for transformational change in organizations can be a turning point.

You can develop the qualities of positive leadership by working with a professional coach. The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put positive leadership into action? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more tap into the intrinsic motivation of followers? Positive leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a positive leader who inspires individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture mindful conversations in the workplace. You can become an inspiring leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

 

 

 

Categories: 

Creating a Positive Mindset and Company Culture

Creating a Positive Mindset and Company Culture

I’ve learned over the years that my most effective executive coaching leadership clients know the “why” of what they are passionate in achieving. They lead from a compassionate and positive space within.

Positive leaders are mindful, and get excited in my office telling me inspiring stories of their hopes and struggles. They have a growth versus fixed mindset, and are optimistic and forward thinking.

One of my CEO executive coaching clients shared with me that he was struggling to convince several of his senior executives on changing their company culture. The data from a recent company engagement survey indicated that far too many employees were not engaged with the mission and vision of the company.

The company culture was negative and toxic. The big egos of top leadership were consistently locked in a battle of who was right and blaming the others for perceived failures. Each of the leaders had a strongly held belief that others were responsible for the mediocre performance of the organization. As a result, negativity cascaded throughout the organization.

I asked the CEO to reflect on the following question: “What behaviors do you observe now and what would you like to see in the future?” He took a moment breathing deeply and responded, “I can be too negative, and tolerate unproductive beliefs and behaviors that don’t contribute to growth”.  

I applauded him on his self-insight and courage to take responsibility for the current situation. I suggested that he first work on changing his own own habits and patterns of behavior which helped create the current culture. He then would model the new desired behavior of positivity and help create resonance for the organization.

After several months of coaching focused on changing his negative beliefs and focusing on positivity, he reported that he felt he was making progress. The CEO changed his habit of focusing on the negative, and began paying attention to what was working well. He was becoming a more inspirational leader telling positive stories that helped create a more resilient culture.

The members of the executive team thought that if he could change and become more positive emotional attractor and stop blaming others well maybe they could too! The CEO was so passionate about his belief in creating a new culture based on trust. They began to pay attention to their own habits and patterns of behavior that were counterproductive to creating a high performance culture.

At an off site Retreat that I facilitated, leaders at all levels of the company co-created a Values Statement that reflected the aspirations of everyone aligned towards a common goal. Values drive commitment. The energy at work was beginning to shift, and people reported being happier and more committed to achieving business results through passionate and conscious collaboration.

Emotionally intelligent leaders know that creating a positive workplace culture and climate where emotions are appropriately expressed increases engagement and moves things forward. In order for people to be fully engaged, they need to feel they are following leaders who inspire them emotionally. Engagement is most influenced by how their leaders behave.

Positive Engagement

The No. 1 reason why most Americans leave their jobs is the feeling they’re not appreciated. In fact, 65% of people surveyed said they received no recognition for good work in a previous year, according to Tom Rath and Donald O. Clifton, authors of How Full Is Your Bucket? Positive Strategies for Work and Life (2004).

According to newer Gallup research, what employees want most — along with competitive pay — is quality management. When they feel unappreciated and disapprove of their managers, they leave or stop trying.

Almost 25% of U.S. employees would fire their bosses if given the chance, and about 50% of actively disengaged workers would follow suit.

A Gallup Management Journal survey found that, of all 24.7 million U.S. workers, roughly 18% are actively disengaged. Gallup estimates the lower productivity of actively disengaged workers costs the U.S. economy about $382 billion (http://gmj.gallup.com/content/28867/Many-Employees-Would-Fire-Their-Boss.aspx).

Because of current economic realities, people may not be leaving their jobs. Instead, they join the ranks of the disengaged and become “missing in action.” It rests upon managers to learn better ways of interacting with the people on whom they depend. Executive coaching can help leaders develop a positive mindset, and connect with the hearts and minds of their people.

The benefits of developing a positive or growth mindset follow:

Ten Benefits of a Positive Mindset

1. Positive people live longer.

2, Positive people are more resilient when facing stressful challenges.

3. Positive work environments outperform negative work environments.

4. Positive, optimistic salespeople sell more than pessimistic salespeople.

5. Positive leaders make better decisions under pressure.

6. Successful marriages are likely to experience a 5-to-1 ratio of positive to negative interactions.

7. Positive people are able to maintain a broader perspective and identify solutions.

8. Positive thoughts and emotions are the antidote to the negative effects of stress.

9. Positive emotions such as gratitude and appreciation help athletes perform at a higher level.

10. Positive leaders are more likely to achieve greater success in the workplace.

You can develop a more positive mindset and company culture by working with an executive coach. The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence your organization’s future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put positive leadership into action? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more positive? Positive leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a positive leader who helps individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture positivity in the workplace. You can become a more positive leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

We coach leaders to cultivate creativity, clarity, focus and trust in a full engagement culture.

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com


Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
 
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
 http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman
 http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
 http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman
 http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

Categories: 

Driven to Lead - Four Basic Human Drives

Driven Leaders

The late Harvard Business School Professor Paul R. Lawrence and Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria propose a theory of four basic drives that motivate all humans in Driven: How Human Nature Shapes Our Choices (Jossey-Bass, 2002). The drives are:

1. To acquire what we need for survival, conception and our offspring’s survival. This drive far surpasses our drives to acquire food, water, warmth and a mate. We are driven to attain things that interest us, give us a sense of identity and meet our loved ones’ needs.

2. To defend ourselves and our offspring from threats. We’ll protect our family and groups to which we belong, our ideas and beliefs, our sense of pride and hope, and our self-image.

3. To bond and form long-term, mutually caring and trusting relationships with others.

4. To comprehend (to learn, create, innovate, and make sense of the world and our place in it).

Leadership, they note, must effectively balance these four basic human drives. While other species survive by feeding, mating, fighting and fleeing, humans survive by feeding, mating, fighting, fleeing, befriending andfiguring out.

Humans have evolved to survive differently from other animals. We have endured as a species because we learned to work in groups and rely on problem-solving skills, rather than brute force, inborn physical capacities and instincts.

We achieve an optimal state of leadership when we cultivate and consciously manage all four drives. It’s not enough to be mindful of one or two of them. As Lawrence and Nohria wrote:

“We would predict that those who have found ways to satisfy all four drives (at least over time) will feel more fulfilled than those who have focused on some to the exclusion of others.”

Lawrence expands his theories in Driven to Lead: Good, Bad, and Misguided Leadership(Jossey-Bass, 2010), citing contemporary brain research that supports how the four drives influence decision-making and actions.

As a leader or manager, how are you balancing all four drives in making business decisions that respect the drives to acquire, defend, bond and comprehend? If you’re ignoring one drive in favor of another you may find yourself and your organization in trouble.

In the work I do coaching leaders in organizations www.workingresources.com, we discuss how to make balanced decisions that sustain progress and profits. Maybe it’s time we have that conversation? You can contact me here mbrusman@workingresources.com.

For now, gaining an understanding of these drives gives you a tremendous leadership advantage — a valuable lens through which to view people’s behaviors. You can develop these qualities by working with a professional coach.The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put positive leadership into action?Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more motivational? Inspiring leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I an inspiring leader who helps individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders inspire followers. You can become a mindful leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

 

 

                               

Categories: 

Inspiring Leadership - Motiviating Others by Building Relationships

We coach leaders to cultivate creativity, clarity, focus and trust in a full engagement culture.

Driven to Lead: What Makes People Tick

Leadership is about relationships with others. You cannot lead without understanding the innate drives that are essential to human development and survival.

Decades of research have given us numerous theories about drive and motivation, to include:

·  Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (physiological, safety, love and belonging, esteem and self-actualization)

·  Intrinsic and extrinsic motivators (inner satisfaction and desires, external rewards and payoffs)

· The well-documented drives to achieve autonomy, mastery and purpose in our personal and professional lives.

·  Economist Milton Friedman’s agency theory, which argues that rational self-interest motivates all human behavior — and that businesses’ sole purpose is to maximize shareholder returns. (Over time, behavioral economists have proved there’s much more to human behavior than rational self-interest.)

Scientists have fragmented the search for the most fundamental drives that make humans tick. Every discipline has proposed a different theory that contains some truths, as viewed through the discrete lenses of:

·  Cultural anthropology

·  Sociology

·  Psychology

·  Genetics

·  Evolutionary biology

·  Economics

·  Neurology

Perhaps the most noteworthy deduction about human behavior can be attributed to Charles Darwin’s scientific studies, published more than 150 years ago. In The Descent of Man (1871), the British naturalist observed that the most important distinction between humans and the lower species is our innate moral sense: our conscience.

The Four-Drive Theory

Humans have evolved to survive differently from other animals. We have endured as a species because we learned to work in groups and rely on problem-solving skills, rather than brute force, inborn physical capacities and instincts.

The late Harvard Business School Professor Paul R. Lawrence suggested that Darwin’s insights about human drives have largely been ignored. He proposed a theory of human behavior based on “renewed Darwinism” and four key drives:

1.  To acquire what we need for survival, conception and our offspring’s survival. This drive far surpasses our drives to acquire food, water, warmth and a mate. We are driven to attain things that interest us, give us a sense of identity and meet our loved ones’ needs.

2.  To defend ourselves and our offspring from threats. We’ll protect our family and groups to which we belong, our ideas and beliefs, our sense of pride and hope, and our self-image.

3.  To bond and form long-term, mutually caring and trusting relationships with others.

4.  To comprehend, to learn, create, innovate, and make sense of the world and our place in it.

Lawrence and Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria applied these drives to the business world in Driven: How Human Nature Shapes Our Choices (Jossey-Bass, 2002). Leadership, they noted, must effectively balance these four basic human drives. While other species survive by feeding, mating, fighting and fleeing, humans survive by feeding, mating, fighting, fleeing, befriending andfiguring out.

We achieve an optimal state of leadership when we cultivate and consciously manage all four drives. It’s not enough to be mindful of one or two of them. As Lawrence and Nohria wrote:

“We would predict that those who have found ways to satisfy all four drives (at least over time) will feel more fulfilled than those who have focused on some to the exclusion of others.”

Conflicting Impulses

We are hardwired to feel conflicting emotions. As leaders, we must continually assess our options and arrive at acceptable decisions.

Animals don’t have this problem. After acquiring food, shelter, a mate and ways to defend themselves against threats, they’re basically set. We, on the other hand, must balance two additional drives:

·  To bond with, trust and care for other people (and to be trusted and cared for by them)

·  To make sense of our lives (understand the “why” and “how”)

These additional drives allow us to adapt better than lower animals, but they also give us more to react to and consider when making decisions. We must balance our teams’ needs and desires against those of the boss, corporation, customers, environment and self.

We are built to work and achieve in groups: to lead and follow, to learn from each other, to trust, to protect and care for each other, to acquire what we need collectively even if we later enjoy it individually. We have evolved in this way because it’s a very successful means of survival.

Bad Leadership Defined

We expect the best from our leaders, but we’ve become inured to news reports of serious political, business and organizational failures — from Wall Street’s historic financial meltdowns to tolerance of child abuse in religious institutions.

Bad leadership becomes an appalling part of the human condition when those at the top focus solely on acquiring more for themselves. “Horrible bosses” have no interest in bonding and getting along with others (unless it furthers their agenda). They spend more time covering up their crimes than finding legitimate ways to succeed.

Good leaders take appropriate actions and make sound decisions that are not based on self-interest. They manage all four drives, recognizing that inaction and lousy decisions spring from focusing on only one or two drives, to the exclusion of others.

A Leadership Advantage

We cannot afford to be “mystified” by our own and others’ behaviors. We’ve seen how destructive we can be to each other. Corporate misdeeds have a significant reach as the world becomes an increasingly global village.

Professor Lawrence’s theory of the four drives is universal, testable and actionable. Time will tell if it gains favor as a basis for understanding motivation and drives.

For now, gaining an understanding of these drives gives you a tremendous leadership advantage — a valuable lens through which to view people’s behaviors. You can develop these qualities by working with a professional coach.The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put positive leadership into action? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more inspiring? Inspiring leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I an inspiring leader who helps individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture mindful conversations in the workplace. You can become a mindful leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

Categories: 

TAKING RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR VISION

While I catching a flight out of Winnipeg this week I met Gavriella. At the age of twenty-two Gavriella emigrated from Israel to Canada in search of freedom and the opportunity to live a life that she perceived impossible if she remained in Israel. Our paths crossed when Gavriella, working at a kiosk in the airport  lounge selling credit cards, asked if I was interested in upgrading to a travel points card. We laughed once she realized that I was already a predominant client of the bank she represented.

 

I've always had respect for those practicing "direct sales" as success requires a high degree of confidence and tenacity, combined with a strong sense of self worth. If you can't find opportunities in rejection, you can never be successful in direct sales.


During our brief discussion I learned that Gavriella had emigrated from Israel to Toronto about two years ago, relocating to Winnipeg in the past month to meet up with her parents who had just recently emigrated.

 

Reflecting on our discussions during my return flight to Toronto, I realized that by the young age of twenty-five, Gavriella had already left her family and friends to immigrate to a new country, and after perceivably becoming comfortable in Toronto, had once again packed her bags and relocated to a new province, taking on employment in perceivably one of the most challenging careers in existence.

 

At a very young age, Gavriella was not only clear on a vision for her life, but she had proven through her actions that she had the courage and confidence to take significant steps towards its attainment. In essence she had done more by the age of twenty-five to achieve her goals then most ever accomplish in a lifetime.

 

Are you clear on the vision for your life; for your career; or for your business?

 

What are the perceived challenges or obstacles that stand between you and your vision?

 

What is stopping you from overcoming those obstacles?

 

If it's courage you seek, take a page from Gavriella's book. Courage and confidence increase as we prove to ourselves what we are capable of achieving. What are you doing to achieve your vision?

 

 

 

Categories: 

Developing Wisdom after Leadership Failure

We coach leaders to cultivate creativity, clarity, focus and trust in a full engagement culture.

The Crucibles of Leadership

The ability to extract wisdom from challenging experiences distinguishes successful leaders from their broken or burned-out peers.

Difficult and, in some cases, career- or life-threatening events are called leadership crucibles. They are trials and tests — points of deep self-reflection that force you to question who you are and what really matters.

After interviewing more than 200 top business and public-sector leaders, authors Warren G. Bennis and Robert J. Thomas were surprised to find that all could point to intense, often traumatic, always unplanned experiences that transformed their distinctive leadership abilities.

Nelson Mandela, Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Al Gore and Barack Obama have all been willing to talk about their contributions to national failures. As leaders, they thrived because they learned from their mistakes, which inspired confidence, loyalty and commitment even in adverse times.

In Search of Leadership Gold

To a scientist, a crucible is a vessel in which substances are heated to high temperatures to trigger a chemical transformation (for example, a steel refinery’s blast furnace).

In the leadership context, think of a crucible as a transformative experience from which you can extract your “gold”: a new or altered sense of identity.

As Bennis notes:

“Just like the alchemists in history used crucibles in the hopes of turning other elements into gold, great leaders emerge in their own lives as a result of how they deal with their crucibles.”

Crucibles set the stage for adaptation. We are forced to develop new competencies that prepare us for future challenges.

In many ways, our capacity to change hinges on our ability to think creatively — to look at a problem and spot unconventional solutions. Adaptive leaders can entertain opposing views. They learn to thrive in the face of uncertainty and negativity. They can tolerate ambiguity and consider multiple options, without defaulting to short-term thinking or premature decision-making.

Buried Treasures

It’s inherently difficult for us to reflect on painful moments, so their lessons may be buried or forgotten on a conscious level. But pain forms memories that subconsciously affect our current behaviors.

Viewed in retrospect, a crucible may become a defining moment in your life, even if you cannot recognize it as it’s happening. Ultimately, it’s an opportunity to question your most basic assumptions and values, and determine how you want to show up in the world.

Conflicts, challenges and early-life difficulties all contribute to crucible moments. For many of us, a crucible may not initially appear to be a loss or hardship. But as you reflect on it, you’ll discover the many ways in which events influence your unconscious behaviors. Some underlying memories are carried into adulthood, undermining your coping skills until you acknowledge and understand their impact on your life.

From Principles to Practice

Business experts once believed we could master leadership skills by reading books and taking classes. It slowly dawned on them that we practice leadership on the job. We learn to be effective leaders by interacting with other people and groups.

Thomas offers three important insights in Crucibles of Leadership: How to Learn from Experience to Become a Great Leader(Harvard Business Review Press, 2008):

1.  Practice can trump talent.

2.  Outstanding leaders devise a strategy for transforming crucibles into learning.

3.  Organizations can grow leaders faster by helping them learn from experience.

Discovering Your Crucibles

It’s almost impossible to take stock of yourself without guidance from a trusted friend, mentor or coach. To be truly self-aware, you need someone to hold a mirror so you can observe past and present behaviors.

Begin the discovery process with writing exercises, which you’ll share and discuss with your coach or mentor. Determine whether difficult childhood experiences are triggering strong emotional reactions in the present.

In Finding Your True North: A Personal Guide(Jossey-Bass, 2009), Bill George, Andrew McLean and Nick Craig suggest writing a letter to yourself describes key crucibles in your life. Present these experiences in one continuous draft, taking as much time and space as you need to complete the letter. Tell the whole story: context, high point, what changed, the emotions you felt, and the consequences and aftereffects.

Answer the following questions as your write:

·   What was the greatest crucible of my life?

·   Why was this experience so challenging for me? (List all reasons.)

·   What was the most stressful, challenging or hard-to-endure point in my story?

·   How did I resolve the crucible experience at the time?

·   In retrospect, how would I reframe it today?

·   What resources did I have at the time, compared to those I have now?

·   Which emotional scars must be healed for me to become a better leader?

·   What fundamental insights did my crucible teach me?

From “I’ to “We”

Leaders often begin their careers with a strong drive to achieve and succeed. They focus on themselves, their performance and the results they want to achieve. As they mature and rise to higher responsibilities, there must be a shift from “I” to “we.”

Great leaders become teachers, role models and mentors, using their influence to groom others. They are ultimately rewarded with the gifts of authenticity, compassion and humility.

As you gain greater self-awareness from your writing exercises, add the following questions to the assignment:

·  How have my crucible experiences enabled me to discover my passion for making a difference in the world?

·  How do my crucibles affect my view of my leadership abilities?

·  Can I pinpoint examples of leading from an “I” vs. “we” perspective?

·  How much time do I spend focusing on others vs. myself?

Be sure to review the answers with your coach or mentor.

You can work on positively impacting your leadership crucibles by working with a professional coach.The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders increase their self-knowledge? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to become more resilient facing difficult challenges? Resonant leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I a mindful leader who helps individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture mindful conversations in the workplace. You can become a mindful leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Workplace Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders. Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman
http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman

http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

 

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The Crucibles of Leadership - In Search of Leadership Gold

We coach leaders to cultivate creativity, clarity, focus and trust in a full engagement culture.

The Crucibles of Leadership

The ability to extract wisdom from challenging experiences distinguishes successful leaders from their broken or burned-out peers.

Difficult and, in some cases, career- or life-threatening events are called leadership crucibles. They are trials and tests — points of deep self-reflection that force you to question who you are and what really matters.

After interviewing more than 200 top business and public-sector leaders, authors Warren G. Bennis and Robert J. Thomas were surprised to find that all could point to intense, often traumatic, always unplanned experiences that transformed their distinctive leadership abilities.

Nelson Mandela, Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Al Gore and Barack Obama have all been willing to talk about their contributions to national failures. As leaders, they thrived because they learned from their mistakes, which inspired confidence, loyalty and commitment even in adverse times.

In Search of Leadership Gold

To a scientist, a crucible is a vessel in which substances are heated to high temperatures to trigger a chemical transformation (for example, a steel refinery’s blast furnace).

In the leadership context, think of a crucible as a transformative experience from which you can extract your “gold”: a new or altered sense of identity.

As Bennis notes:

“Just like the alchemists in history used crucibles in the hopes of turning other elements into gold, great leaders emerge in their own lives as a result of how they deal with their crucibles.”

Crucibles set the stage for adaptation. We are forced to develop new competencies that prepare us for future challenges.

In many ways, our capacity to change hinges on our ability to think creatively — to look at a problem and spot unconventional solutions. Adaptive leaders can entertain opposing views. They learn to thrive in the face of uncertainty and negativity. They can tolerate ambiguity and consider multiple options, without defaulting to short-term thinking or premature decision-making.

Buried Treasures

It’s inherently difficult for us to reflect on painful moments, so their lessons may be buried or forgotten on a conscious level. But pain forms memories that subconsciously affect our current behaviors.

Viewed in retrospect, a crucible may become a defining moment in your life, even if you cannot recognize it as it’s happening. Ultimately, it’s an opportunity to question your most basic assumptions and values, and determine how you want to show up in the world.

Conflicts, challenges and early-life difficulties all contribute to crucible moments. For many of us, a crucible may not initially appear to be a loss or hardship. But as you reflect on it, you’ll discover the many ways in which events influence your unconscious behaviors. Some underlying memories are carried into adulthood, undermining your coping skills until you acknowledge and understand their impact on your life.

From Principles to Practice

Business experts once believed we could master leadership skills by reading books and taking classes. It slowly dawned on them that we practice leadership on the job. We learn to be effective leaders by interacting with other people and groups.

Thomas offers three important insights in Crucibles of Leadership: How to Learn from Experience to Become a Great Leader(Harvard Business Review Press, 2008):

1.  Practice can trump talent.

2.  Outstanding leaders devise a strategy for transforming crucibles into learning.

3.  Organizations can grow leaders faster by helping them learn from experience.

Discovering Your Crucibles

It’s almost impossible to take stock of yourself without guidance from a trusted friend, mentor or coach. To be truly self-aware, you need someone to hold a mirror so you can observe past and present behaviors.

Begin the discovery process with writing exercises, which you’ll share and discuss with your coach or mentor.

Determine whether difficult childhood experiences are triggering strong emotional reactions in the present. In Finding Your True North: A Personal Guide(Jossey-Bass, 2009), Bill George, Andrew McLean and Nick Craig suggest writing a letter to yourself describes key crucibles in your life. Present these experiences in one continuous draft, taking as much time and space as you need to complete the letter. Tell the whole story: context, high point, what changed, the emotions you felt, and the consequences and aftereffects.

Answer the following questions as your write:

·    What was the greatest crucible of my life?

·    Why was this experience so challenging for me? (List all reasons.)

·    What was the most stressful, challenging or hard-to-endure point in my story?

·    How did I resolve the crucible experience at the time?

·    In retrospect, how would I reframe it today?

·    What resources did I have at the time, compared to those I have now?

·    Which emotional scars must be healed for me to become a better leader?

·    What fundamental insights did my crucible teach me?

From “I’ to “We”

Leaders often begin their careers with a strong drive to achieve and succeed. They focus on themselves, their performance and the results they want to achieve. As they mature and rise to higher responsibilities, there must be a shift from “I” to “we.”

Great leaders become teachers, role models and mentors, using their influence to groom others. They are ultimately rewarded with the gifts of authenticity, compassion and humility.

As you gain greater self-awareness from your writing exercises, add the following questions to the assignment:

·   How have my crucible experiences enabled me to discover my passion for making a difference in the world?

·   How do my crucibles affect my view of my leadership abilities?

·   Can I pinpoint examples of leading from an “I” vs. “we” perspective?

·   How much time do I spend focusing on others vs. myself?

Be sure to review the answers with your coach or mentor.

You can develop these qualities by working with a professional coach. The investment is well worth the reward: your ability to influence the future, your career and your personal-development capabilities.

Are you working in a company where executive coaches provide leadership development to help leaders put positive leadership into action? Does your organization provide executive coaching for leaders who need to be more positive? Positive leaders tap into their emotional intelligence and social intelligence skills to create a more fulfilling future.

One of the most powerful questions you can ask yourself is “Am I an emotionally intelligent and mindful leader who helps individuals and organizations achieve their highest potential, flourish at work, experience elevating energy and achieve levels of effectiveness difficult to attain otherwise?” Emotionally intelligent and socially intelligent organizations provide executive coaching to help leaders develop more positive teams.

Working with a seasoned executive coach and leadership consultant trained in emotional intelligence and incorporating assessments such as the Bar-On EQ-I, CPI 260 and Denison Culture Survey can help leaders nurture mindful conversations in the workplace. You can become a mindful leader who models emotional intelligence and social intelligence, and who inspires people to become fully engaged with the vision, mission and strategy of your company or law firm.

Working Resources is a San Francisco Bay Area Executive Coaching Firm Helping Innovative Companies and Law Firms Assess, Select, Coach, Engage and Retain Emotionally Intelligent Leaders; Executive Coaching; Leadership Development; Performance-Based Interviewing; Competency Modeling; Succession Management; Culture Change; Career Coaching and Leadership Retreats

...About Dr. Maynard Brusman

Dr. Maynard Brusman

Consulting Psychologist and Executive Coach|
Trusted Advisor to Executive Leadership Teams
Mindfulness & Emotional Intelligence Leadership Development Expert

Dr. Maynard Brusman is a consulting psychologist and executive coach. He is the president of Working Resources, a leadership consulting and executive coaching firm. We specialize in helping San Francisco Bay Area companies select and develop emotionally intelligent leaders.  Maynard is a highly sought-after speaker and workshop leader. He facilitates leadership retreats in Northern California and Costa Rica. The Society for Advancement of Consulting (SAC) awarded Dr. Maynard Brusman "Board Approved" designations in the specialties of Executive Coaching and Leadership Development.

“Maynard Brusman is one of the foremost coaches in the United States. He utilizes a wide variety of assessments in his work with senior executives and upper level managers, and is adept at helping his clients both develop higher levels of emotional intelligence and achieve breakthrough business results. As a senior leader in the executive coaching field, Dr. Brusman brings an exceptional level of wisdom, energy, and creativity to his work.” — Jeffrey E. Auerbach, Ph.D., President, College of Executive Coaching

For more information, please go to http://www.workingresources.com, write to mbrusman@workingresources.com, or call 415-546-1252.

Subscribe to Working Resources Newsletter: http://www.workingresources.com
Visit Maynard's Blog: http://www.workingresourcesblog.com 

Connect with me on these Social Media sites.
http://twitter.com/drbrusman
http://www.facebook.com/maynardbrusman

http://www.linkedin.com/in/maynardbrusman

http://www.youtube.com/user/maynardbrusman
http://google.com/+maynardbrusman

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